Joss paper

(redirected from Ghost money)
Related to Ghost money: Joss paper, Money paid
1.Gold and silver paper burned by the Chinese, in the form of coins or ingots, in worship and at funerals.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the final day of the festival, the ship is set alight at midnight on a bed of ghost money.
Bookmakers expressed dismay at the false five-point plunge because it gave punters the impression a gamble was under way, encouraging them to follow ghost money.
The titles of Mark Bradford's recent exhibition, "Nobody Jones," and of featured works such as the collage painting Ghost Money (all works 2007), hint that the show's abstraction of urban topography might find an echo in the notion of hauntology.
The sprawling matrix at the center of Ghost Money floats against a patchy field of silver-gray; an interzone of noncolor inflected by non-forms that also echoes the hauntological construction of the specter; that which exists only as a twilit half-presence.
The scene was a Taoist temple in Tainan, the oldest city in Taiwan,and the notes were no ordinary currency,but ghost money,burned to ensure the dead have enough to live on and grant good fortune to their living relatives.
The altar was laden with ghost money and ghost gold,as well as fruit and drinks to sustain the dead.
The scene was a Taoist temple in Tainan, the oldest city in Taiwan, and the notes were no ordinary currency, but ghost money, burned to ensure the dead have enough to live on and grant good fortune to their living relatives.
The scene was a Taoist temple in Tainan, the oldest city in Taiwan, and the notes were no ordinary currency,but ghost money,burned to ensure the dead have enough to live on and grant good fortune to their living relatives.
Bookmakers expressed dismay at the false five-point plunge in odds within as many minutes because it gave punters the impression a gamble was under way, encouraging them to follow ghost money.
Bookmakers expressed their dismay at the false five-point plummet in odds within as many minutes because it gave punters the impression that a gamble was taking place, encouraging them to follow ghost money.