mountain beaver

(redirected from Giant mole)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

mountain beaver

n.
A stout burrowing rodent (Aplodontia rufa) of the Pacific coast of North America, having small eyes and ears and feeding on vegetation such as ferns and tree seedlings. Also called sewellel.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mountain beaver - bulky nocturnal burrowing rodent of uplands of the Pacific coast of North Americamountain beaver - bulky nocturnal burrowing rodent of uplands of the Pacific coast of North America; the most primitive living rodent
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
Aplodontia, genus Aplodontia - type genus of the Aplodontiidae: comprising the mountain beavers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
40,000 years ago, the settlers survived mainly on large rats (so-called giant mole rats), which were grilled on an open fire.
Bucking perceived stereotypes, Ethiopia can be remarkably green (and cold) as I discover on a trek through the Bale Mountains in search of endangered nyala, giant mole rats and Ethiopian wolves.
Look out for giant mole hills, rabbit holes galore and tree species which include silver birch, oak, birch, rowan, goat willow, hawthorn, blackthorn, holly and elder.
Many were attracted by a controversial giant mole exhibit he brought to the town in 2006, as well as another much talked about contemporary art piece made of recycled junk.
But that fact alone provides scant reason for according him attention beyond such occasional and insightful observations as 'There is a strikingly close parallel between Kafka's frantic burrower (the writer as giant mole), trapped in his own construct, and De Quincey as Gothic "coiner" sitting in a "deep grave-like recess"' (p.