gigantomachy


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gigantomachy

(ˌdʒaɪɡænˈtɒməkɪ) or

gigantomachia

n, pl -chies or -chias
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the war fought between the gods of Olympus and the rebelling giants. See giant3
2. any battle fought between or as if between giants
[C17: from Greek gigantomakhia, from gigas giant + makhē battle]

gigantomachy

1. a war between giants, as in mythology.
2. war between large contestants, as major powers.
See also: War
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References in periodicals archive ?
| According to Greek mythology, Halkidiki was where Gigantomachy, the battle between the giants and the Olympians, took place.
Leon Golub's monumental painting Gigantomachy II (1966), pictured below, is at the centre of this survey exhibition, which also features works from the artist's most important series, alongside early paintings and works on paper.
In a chapter of State of Exception (2003), entitled "Gigantomachy Concerning a Void," Giorgio Agamben reconstructs the "esoteric dossier" underlying the intellectual exchange between Walter Benjamin and Carl Schmitt through Benjamin's Critique of Violence (1921), Schmitt's Political Theology (1922), and then Benjamin's Theses on the Philosophy of History (1940).
Dionysos' connection with Zeus and his role as a god who both transgresses and maintains boundaries foregrounds the "cosmic dimension" of Dionysos that Cornelia Isler-Kerenyi interprets in his role at the wedding of Peleus and Thetis, the Return of Hephaistos to Olympos, and the Gigantomachy (gods vs.
(15) Murgatroyd (2001,294) suggests that this accusation refers to the Titanomachy or Gigantomachy and, further, that Tibullus is raising the puella to the status of a diva.
Reddit user Gigantomachy posted about how parents handed out little bags of candy to everyone on one flight.
(9) In the simile, even the mountain Ossa fears Hylaeus (4.141), Ossa not only a place associated with centauromachy (5.261-62) but also with gigantomachy. (10) Hylaeus then stops before the river, Peneus (144-45), a river with Stygian associations.
Butler, George E "Giants and Fallen Angels in Dante and Milton: The Commedia and the Gigantomachy in Paradise Lost." Modern Philology 95.3 (1998): 352-63.
Inside the PMA, a suite of monumental gunpowder drawings from 2007--vaguely reminiscent of Leon Golub's 1965-67 "Gigantomachy" paintings, with their abraded surfaces and intimation of violence-evoked the four seasons in virtuoso "brushwork." (The installation was insightfully situated: From the room next door, the overlapping voices reciting the days of the week in Bruce Nauman's Days, 2009, amplified the sense of feebly structured epic time, while overhead, hanging on filament, a procession of tiny golden boats seemed to float into the afterworld--via the "moon" in Sol LeWitt's On a Blue Ceiling, 1981, in the passage beyond.) But the human element essential to Cai's work comes to the fore in his explosion events.
If we look at Odes 3.9 in terms of its function in the unit, the impact of the battle of wills between two individuals increases significantly, if it is also read as a crafty lyric take on the epic excesses of the Gigantomachy, used to amplify the argument in Odes 3.4.
And, in fact, the Gigantomachy pervades Claudian's other writings.