Gila River


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Gila River

A river rising in the mountains of western New Mexico and flowing about 1,050 km (650 mi) generally westward across southern Arizona to the Colorado River at Yuma in southwestern Arizona.
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Noun1.Gila River - a river that rises in western New Mexico and flows westward through southern Arizona to become a tributary of the Colorado RiverGila River - a river that rises in western New Mexico and flows westward through southern Arizona to become a tributary of the Colorado River
Arizona, Grand Canyon State, AZ - a state in southwestern United States; site of the Grand Canyon
Land of Enchantment, New Mexico, NM - a state in southwestern United States on the Mexican border
References in classic literature ?
We were prospecting and it was our intention, if we found nothing, to push through to the Gila river at some point near Big Bend, where we understood there was a settlement.
Phenetic analysis based on polymorphic allele frequencies indicated Gila River samples were most similar to one another, Aravaipa most similar to the Gila group, and the Verde sample the most divergent of those examined [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3E OMITTED].
Farmers in charge of the Desert People of the Gila River valley found the Tohono O'odham very good people to work with.
Ocean Power, one of the latest volumes in the commendable Sun Tracks series, derives from the culture and traditions of the Tohono O'odham, who have been more generally known as the Papago and who live today where the Spanish found them in the sixteenth century: astride the Arizona-Mexico border below the Gila River.
"Spiritually, repatriation is a tremendous lift," says Cecil Anton, a member of the local tribal council of the Gila River Indian community, an O'odham reservation just south of Phoenix.
Rea, author of Once a River: Bird Life and Habitat Changes on the Middle Gila, has conducted research on the Gila River Indian Reservation for more than 30 years.
On December 30, 1853, the United States signed a treaty with Mexico taking possession of a strip of territory south of the Gila River (in what is now Arizona and New Mexico) in order that a railroad might be built through it.
The numbers served by tribe were: Fort Apache, 6; Fort McDowell, 2; Fort Mohave, 8; Gila River, 9; Hopi, 20; Kaibab, 6; Navajo, 121; Pasqua Yaqui, 3; Hualapai, 10; Salt River, 16; San Carlos, 8; and Tohono O'Odham, 2.
decided it wanted the land--the mountain for logging, and the adjacent Gila River valley for mining and agriculture.
Both tribes, now living on reservations near Gila River and Salt River, Ariz., are descendants of peaceful Indians who once farmed the same regions.
Stephen Kearny's expedition at the start of the Mexican War (May 1846), where he opened negotiations with Mexican authorities for the abandonment of the territory; as temporary lieutenant colonel, he organized the Mormon Battalion and led it through southern New Mexico and Arizona, across the Gila River, and into San Diego to join with the rest of Kearny's force (January 29, 1847); promoted major and then brevet lieutenant colonel of 2d Dragoons (February 1847); served in the occupation forces in Mexico City (1848); returning to frontier duty, served in the Sioux expedition (April 1855-July 1856), the Kansas border troubles, and the Mormon expedition under Gen.
all of Mexico north of the Rio Grande and the Gila River -- about a million square miles of land.