Gilbertine


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Gilbertine

(ˈɡɪlbətaɪn; -tɪn)
n
(Christian Churches, other) a member of a Christian order founded in approximately 1135 by St Gilbert of Sempringham, composed of nuns who followed the Cistercian rule and Augustinian canons who ministered to them. It was the only religious order of English origin and never spread to Europe
adj
(Christian Churches, other) of, relating to, or belonging to this order
References in periodicals archive ?
His wife Eleanor de Montfort died in childbirth and his daughter Princess Gwenllian, aged six months, was taken to a Gilbertine priory at Sempringham, Lincolnshire, and died there at 54 years old.
Reconstructing relationships among mortality, status, and gender at the medieval Gilbertine Priory of St.
81) With the exception of the Gilbertine Order, where genders live a separate life and meet only for the office in Church, then separated physically by a wall.
Comparative Degenerative Joint Disease of the vertebral column in the Medieval Monastic Cemetery of the Gilbertine Priory of St.
Gilbertine, Olga, and Yes, Olga are described as consisting of "painted re-inforced clay" and "painted MDF plinth," suggesting that their straightforward, rectangular white bases are elements in the work rather than provisional presentational devices.
There were many more monasteries--Benedictine, Cluniac, Augustinian and Gilbertine.
Gilbert of Sempringham, founder of the Gilbertine Order.
While the reference might be to the Gilbertine Order in England (which had some thriving double monasteries in the high Middle Ages), this order was never "notorious.
Taking each of the categories above, there is no evidence to suggest that he was a member of the Gilbertine Order.
or Robert of Brunne, c1264 - c1340) English poet and chronicler, member of a Gilbertine monastery after 1288.
Princess Gwenllian was just a tiny baby when she was taken from her home and imprisoned hundreds of miles away in the remote Gilbertine Priory at Sempringham.
The statement attributed by this early-thirteenth-century Gilbertine to the abbots at a chapter in 1147 is clearly anachronistic.