Gileadite


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Gileadite

(ˈɡɪlɪəˌdaɪt)
n
(Bible) an inhabitant of Gilead

Gileadite

(ˈɡɪlɪəˌdaɪt)
n
(Bible) a descendant of Gilead

Gil•e•ad•ite

(ˈgɪl i əˌdaɪt)

n.
1. a member of a branch of the Israelite tribe descended from Manasseh.
2. an inhabitant of ancient Gilead.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(b) an offspring of Machir, mentioned in a Gileadite genealogy: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], "The sons of Manasseh: Asriel, whom his Aramean concubine bore; she bore Machir the father of Gilead.
You've got to really know your Bible to recognize Hoglah as one of the daughters of Zelophehad the Gileadite, but, sadly, most people don't know the Bible that well.
Tennyson elsewhere refers explicitly to lephthah and his daughter in "A Dream of Fair Women" (1832; Poems 1.479-92; she is the "daughter of the warrior Gileadite," 197), "Aylmer's Field" (1864; Poems 2.657-82), and "The Flight" (ca.
But given the way in which the palimpsest that is Gilead continually re-appropriates Christian doctrine for its own power-driven agenda (the second time Ruders quotes Bach is during the Particicution), and because the quotation immediately follows a liturgical-sounding exchange between Lydia and Offred, the song also conveys aspects of Gileadite theology, which makes the experience of listening to the extraordinarily poignant Bach quotation extraordinarily painful.
Finally, Humphreys offers another reading of the last one and a half verses of the story, which in the King James version reads: 'And it was a custom in Israel, that the daughters of Israel went yearly to lament the daughter of Jephthah the Gileadite four days in a year'.
230: gil 'adi 'Gileadite' is erroneously translated in the plural.
Deal loyally, on the other hand, with the children of Barzillai the Gileadite, and let them be among those who eat at your table; for they greeted me with similar loyalty when I fled from Absalom your brother.
The story of Jephthah's Daughter (Judges 11) tells us that Jephthah the Gileadite made a vow to the Lord before going into battle with the Ammonites.
Hendel believes that the Gileadite sin was deceptively similar to the Ephraimite samekh.
Then the Gileadites took the fords of the Jordan against the Ephraimites.
Gideon and Abimelech are of the tribe of Manasseh, Tola is of the tribe of Issachar, Jair and Jephthah are Gileadites. If we look at the two judges after Ibzan, Elon and Abdon, we find that they are also northerners, from the tribes of Zebulun and Ephraim respectively.
His reference is to the incident recorded in the Book of Judges, chapter twelve, when the Gileadites slaughter the Ephraimites who could not pronounce correctly the word "shibboleth" (Judges 12:56).