recession

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re·ces·sion 1

 (rĭ-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The fact or action of moving away or back, especially:
a. The erosion of a cliff or headland from a given point, as from the action of a waterfall.
b. The reduction of a glacier from a point of advancement.
c. The motion of celestial objects away from one another in an expanding universe.
2. A significant period of economic decline from the peak to the trough of a business cycle, characterized by decreasing aggregate output and often by rising unemployment.
3. The withdrawal in a line or file of participants in a ceremony, especially clerics and choir members after a church service.

[Latin recessiō, recessiōn-, from recessus, past participle of recēdere, to recede; see recede1.]

re·ces′sion·ar′y adj.

re·ces·sion 2

 (rē-sĕsh′ən)
n. Law
The restoration of property by a grantee back to the previous owner by means of a legal conveyance.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recession

(rɪˈsɛʃən)
n
1. (Economics) a temporary depression in economic activity or prosperity
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the withdrawal of the clergy and choir in procession from the chancel at the conclusion of a church service
3. the act of receding
4. (Building) a part of a building, wall, etc, that recedes
[C17: from Latin recessio; see recess]

recession

(riːˈsɛʃən)
n
the act of restoring possession to a former owner
[C19: from re- + cession]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•ces•sion

(rɪˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. a period of economic decline when production, employment, and earnings fall below normal levels.
2. the act of receding or withdrawing.
3. a receding part of a wall, building, etc.
4. a withdrawing procession, as at the end of a religious service.
[1640–50; < Latin recessiō. See recess, -tion]
re•ces′sion•ar′y, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Recession

 of economists—Lipton, 1970.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

recession

A temporary decline in economic activity.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recession - the state of the economy declinesrecession - the state of the economy declines; a widespread decline in the GDP and employment and trade lasting from six months to a year
economic condition - the condition of the economy
2.recession - a small concavity
pharyngeal recess - a small recess in the wall of the pharynx
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
3.recession - the withdrawal of the clergy and choir from the chancel to the vestry at the end of a church service
procession - the group action of a collection of people or animals or vehicles moving ahead in more or less regular formation; "processions were forbidden"
4.recession - the act of ceding back
ceding, cession - the act of ceding
5.recession - the act of becoming more distant
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recession

noun depression, drop, decline, slump, downturn, slowdown, trough The recession caused sales to drop off.
boom, upturn
Quotations
"It's a recession when your neighbour loses his job; it's a depression when you lose yours" [Harry S. Truman]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

recession

noun
A period of decreased business activity and high unemployment:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَراجُع، إنْحِسارركود
hospodářský poklesrecese
lavkonjunkturrecession
lamalamakausilaskusuhdannetaantuma
recesija
gazdasági pangásrecesszió
efnahagsleg lægî, samdráttur
不況景気後退衰退退去
불경기
nuosmukis
lejupslīde
hospodársky pokles
lågkonjunktur
การตกต่ำทางเศรษฐกิจ
tình trạng suy thoái

recession

[rɪˈseʃən] N
1. (Econ) → recesión f
to be in recessionestar en recesión or retroceso
2. (frm) (= receding) → retroceso m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recession

[rɪˈsɛʃən] n (ECONOMICS)récession f
to go into recession → entrer en récession
to be in recession → être en récession
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

recession

n
no pl (receding) → Zurückweichen f, → Rückgang m; (Eccl) → Auszug m
(Econ) → Rezession f, → (wirtschaftlicher) Rückgang
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recession

[rɪˈsɛʃn] n (Econ) → recessione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

recession

(rəˈseʃən) noun
a temporary fall in a country's or the world's business activities.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

recession

ركود recese lavkonjunktur Rezession ύφεση recesión lamakausi récession recesija recessione 景気後退 불경기 recessie tilbakegang recesja recessão спад lågkonjunktur การตกต่ำทางเศรษฐกิจ durgunluk tình trạng suy thoái 衰退
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

re·ces·sion

n. recesión, retirada, retroceso patológico de tejidos tal como la retracción de la encía.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of the total 175 patients, 58.3% (n= 102) of the patients had gingival recession while 41.7% (n= 73) were without gingival recession (Table 1).
[3] The likelihood of the development of new dehiscence further contributing to gingival recession is considerably reduced.
Such tooth movements enhance susceptibility to gingival recession particularly in individuals with thin gingival biotype due to the gingiva losing its alveolar bone support (4, 5).
An abnormal bite between the opposing teeth can also affect periodontal health, and this could lead to the gingival recession with thinning of the alveolar bone and mobility of the opposing mandibular tooth/teeth [6, 9, 10].
In cases, the probing depth, clinical attachment level were negatively correlated with the thickness of attached gingiva with a Karl Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.157 (p value 0.230), 0.221 (p value 0.090), respectively and gingival recession showed a negative correlation with Karl Pearson's correlation coefficients of -0.06 (p value 0.649).
Incorrect crown margin placement, invading the Dentogingival Complex (DGC) attachment zone, increases the risk of inflammation, spontaneous bleeding, hyperplasia, and gingival recession (5, 6), predisposing host susceptibility to gingival and periodontal diseases (7).
Thus, the purpose of this subsequent study was to evaluate the healing response of gingival recession treated with collagen membrane and DFDBA by means of histometrical assessment in dogs.
(45) showed that bonded fixed retainers cause increased plaque accumulation, gingival recession, and bleeding on probing.
It also increases the risk of accumulation, dental sensitivity and gingival recession, risk of caries, swelling of gums, trauma to the gums leading to the bleeding gum problems.