Gipsy


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Gip·sy

 (jĭp′sē)
n.
Variant of Gypsy.

Gipsy

(ˈdʒɪpsɪ)
n, pl -sies
(Peoples) (sometimes not capital) a variant spelling of Gypsy
ˈGipsyish adj
ˈGipsydom n
ˈGipsyˌhood n
ˈGipsy-ˌlike adj

Gyp•sy

(ˈdʒɪp si)

n., pl. -sies,
adj. n.
1. a member of a traditionally itinerant people, orig. of N India, now residing mostly in permanent communities in many countries of the world.
3. (l.c.) a person who resembles the stereotype of a Gypsy, as in appearance or itinerant way of life.
4. (l.c.) Informal. gypsy cab.
5. (l.c.) Informal. an independent, usu. nonunion trucker, operator, etc.
6. (l.c.) a chorus dancer, esp. in the Broadway theater.
adj.
7. of or pertaining to the Gypsies.
8. (l.c.) Informal. working independently or without a license: gypsy truckers.
Also, esp. Brit., Gipsy, gipsy.
[1505–15; back formation from gipcyan, aph. variant of Egyptian, from the belief that Gypsies came orig. from Egypt]
Gyp′sy•ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gipsy - a laborer who moves from place to place as demanded by employment; "itinerant traders"
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
swagger, swaggie, swagman - an itinerant Australian laborer who carries his personal belongings in a bundle as he travels around in search of work
tinker - formerly a person (traditionally a Gypsy) who traveled from place to place mending pots and kettles and other metal utensils as a way to earn a living
2.Gipsy - a member of a people with dark skin and hair who speak Romany and who traditionally live by seasonal work and fortunetellingGipsy - a member of a people with dark skin and hair who speak Romany and who traditionally live by seasonal work and fortunetelling; they are believed to have originated in northern India but now are living on all continents (but mostly in Europe, North Africa, and North America)
Indian - a native or inhabitant of India
gitana - a Spanish female Gypsy
gitano - a Spanish male Gypsy
Translations
غَجَريغَجَري، مِن الغَجَر
sígauna-sígauni
čigānsčigānu-
cigáncigánsky

gipsy

[ˈdʒɪpsi]
nbohémien(ne) m/f
modif [site, camp] → de bohémiens; [music] → tzigane gipsy caravangipsy caravan nroulotte f

gipsy

, gypsy
nZigeuner(in) m(f) (neg!)
adj attrZigeuner-; gipsy musicZigeunermusik f

gypsy,

gipsy

(ˈdʒipsi) plurals ˈgypsies ~ˈgipsies noun
a member of a race of wandering people.
adjective
a gypsy caravan.
References in classic literature ?
In fact, for a couple of hours I met nothing worth mentioning, male or female, with the exception of a gipsy caravan, which I suppose was both; but it was a poor show.
A gipsy encampment to-day is little more than a moving slum, a scab of squalor on the fair face of the countryside.
As the young gipsy's little holiday came to an end, I turned with a sigh upon my way; and here, while still on the subject, may I remark on the curious fact that probably Borrow has lived and died without a single gipsy having heard of him, just as the expertest anglers know nothing of Izaak Walton.
There were no women or children, as she had seen in other gipsy camps they had passed in their wayfaring, and but one gipsy--a tall athletic man, who stood with his arms folded, leaning against a tree at a little distance off, looking now at the fire, and now, under his black eyelashes, at three other men who were there, with a watchful but half-concealed interest in their conversation.
It was quite plain that he acted the bully, and his friend the peacemaker, for some particular purpose; or rather, it would have been to any one but the weak old man; for they exchanged glances quite openly, both with each other and with the gipsy, who grinned his approval of the jest until his white teeth shone again.
You see, Isaac,' said his friend, growing more eager, and drawing himself closer to the old man, while he signed to the gipsy not to come between them; 'you see, Isaac, strangers are going in and out every hour of the day; nothing would be more likely than for one of these strangers to get under the good lady's bed, or lock himself in the cupboard; suspicion would be very wide, and would fall a long way from the mark, no doubt.
This was addressed to the gipsy, who crawled into the low tent on all fours, and after some rummaging and rustling returned with a cash-box, which the man who had spoken opened with a key he wore about his person.
The gipsy produced three tin cups, and filled them to the brim with brandy.
She had on a red cloak and a black bonnet: or rather, a broad-brimmed gipsy hat, tied down with a striped handkerchief under her chin.
I said this rather to myself than to the gipsy, whose strange talk, voice, manner, had by this time wrapped me in a kind of dream.
The child said he had been given to gipsies after being abandoned by his parents and his adoptive mother claimed to have bought the boy from another gipsy.
Anxious to grab a slice of the off-road, military and agricultural sales being gained by the Land Rover, Austin swept in with Gipsy which looked a bit like its competitor but featured steel bodywork rather than aluminium which was its downfall as it rusted in extreme and farmyard conditions.