Arcimboldo

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Ar·cim·bol·do

 (är′chēm-bōl′dō), Giuseppe 1527-1593.
Italian painter noted for his surreal portraits in which the subjects' features are composed of other animate or inanimate objects.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Arcimboldo

(Italian artʃimˈbɔldo)
n
(Biography) Giuseppe. 1527–93, Italian painter, best remembered for painting grotesque figures composed of fruit, vegetables, and meat
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Giuseppe Arcimboldo Vertumnus (Emperor Rudolph II) 1591, oil on wood
Inspired by Italian artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1527-1593), who created portraits by using objects, such as flowers, vegetables, and fruit, Adams chose brightly colored artificial flowers and insects to create a spring-like mask to symbolize rebirth and rejuvenation.
When he painted this portrait of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II (1552-1612), Giuseppe Arcimboldo used his imagination, and portrayed him as "Vertumnus," the Roman god of vegetation and the seasons.
His inspiration goes as far back as Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1527-1593), the clown prince of Renaissance artists.
Included in Von Aachen's circle are other Northern masters active both in Prague and Italy, most notably Bartholomaus Spranger (1546-1611) and Joseph Heintz the Elder (1564-1609), as well as the Milanese eccentric Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1527-93), whose famous composite portrait heads have recently migrated from the Northern rooms of the Kunsthistorisches Museum to the Italian wing, reducing the appeal of Von Aachen and company.
She compared the portraits to those of 16th century Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo who incorporated images of fruits and vegetables in his works.
Centuries ago, he was the butt of a particularly biting caricature by a masterful artist named Giuseppe Arcimboldo.
The Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo served as court portraitist to Ferdinand I at the Habsburg court in Vienna and later to Maximilian II and his son Rudolf II at the court in Prague.
(176) The sonnet is animated by a skillful wit that balances the opposite images of a building and a face into the same textual unity, in the same way as the Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo did in his paintings in the same period.