moraine

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mo·raine

 (mə-rān′)
n.
An accumulation of boulders, stones, or other debris carried and deposited by a glacier.

[French, from French dialectal morena, mound of earth, from Provençal morre, muzzle, from Vulgar Latin *murrum.]

mo·rain′al, mo·rain′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

moraine

(mɒˈreɪn)
n
(Physical Geography) a mass of debris, carried by glaciers and forming ridges and mounds when deposited
[C18: from French, from Savoy dialect morena, of obscure origin]
moˈrainal, moˈrainic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mo•raine

(məˈreɪn)

n.
1. a ridge, mound, or irregular mass of unstratified glacial drift, chiefly boulders, gravel, sand, and clay.
2. a deposit of such material left on the ground by a glacier.
[1780–90; < French < Franco-Provençal morêna rise in the ground =mour(o) mound + -ena suffix of landforms]
mo•rain′al, mo•rain′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mo·raine

(mə-rān′)
A mass of boulders, pebbles, sand, and mud deposited in the form of a long ridge along the front or sides of a glacier. Moraines typically form because of the plowing effect of a moving glacier, which causes it to pick up rock fragments and sediments as it moves, and because of the periodic melting of the ice, which causes the glacier to deposit these materials during warmer intervals. ♦ A moraine that forms in front of a glacier is a terminal moraine. ♦ A moraine that forms along the side of a glacier is a lateral moraine.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

moraine

Rock debris moved or dumped by a melting glacier or ice sheet.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moraine - accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glaciermoraine - accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glacier
glacier - a slowly moving mass of ice
earth, ground - the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface; "they dug into the earth outside the church"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

moraine

[mɒˈreɪn] Nmorena f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

moraine

nMoräne f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

moraine

[mɒˈreɪn] nmorena
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Millenia ago, the retreating ice sheets deposited glacial debris behind the volcanic plug of the rock on which Edinburgh Castle was built, resulting in the distinctive crag and tail formation where the Old Town of Edinburgh stands.
Nine other labourers, who were working inside a ruby mine, have been rescued from beneath the glacial debris and admitted to District Headquarters Hospital Mansehra for treatment of minor injuries, officials said.
'Stepping over meltwater channels, witnessing glacial debris, moulins and moraines, and learning where and when not to travel on a glacier--I was able to ask questions and understand so much more about what was happening on and off the glacier,' he says.
Using sulfur isotopes to determine the oxygen content of ~2.3 billion year-old rocks in the Transvaal Supergroup in South Africa, they found evidence of a sudden increase in atmospheric oxygen that broadly coincided with physical evidence of glacial debris, and geochemical evidence of a new world-order for the carbon cycle.