glacier

(redirected from Glacial refugia)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

glacier

a mass of slowly moving land ice formed by the accumulation of snow on high ground
Not to be confused with:
glazier – a person who fits windows with glass or panes of glass
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

gla·cier

 (glā′shər)
n.
A huge mass of ice slowly flowing over a landmass, formed from compacted snow in an area where snow accumulation has exceeded melting and sublimation.

[French, from Old French, cold place, from glace, ice, from Vulgar Latin *glacia, from Latin glaciēs; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

gla′ciered adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glacier

(ˈɡlæsɪə; ˈɡleɪs-)
n
(Physical Geography) a slowly moving mass of ice originating from an accumulation of snow. It can either spread out from a central mass (continental glacier) or descend from a high valley (alpine glacier)
[C18: from French (Savoy dialect), from Old French glace ice, from Late Latin glacia, from Latin glaciēs ice]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gla•cier

(ˈgleɪ ʃər)

n.
an extended mass of ice formed from snow falling and accumulating over the years and moving very slowly, either descending from high mountains, as in valley glaciers, or moving outward from centers of accumulation, as in continental glaciers.
[1735–45; < dial. French, derivative of Old French glace ice < Vulgar Latin *glacia]
gla′ciered, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gla·cier

(glā′shər)
A large mass of ice flowing very slowly through a valley or spreading outward from a center. Glaciers form over many years from packed snow in areas where snow accumulates faster than it melts. A glacier is always moving, but when its forward edge melts faster than the ice behind it advances, the glacier as a whole shrinks backward.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glacier

A mass of ice that creeps down a valley, scouring its floor and sides.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glacier - a slowly moving mass of iceglacier - a slowly moving mass of ice    
Alpine glacier, Alpine type of glacier - a glacier that moves down from a high valley
continental glacier - a glacier that spreads out from a central mass of ice
icefall - a steep part of a glacier resembling a frozen waterfall
ice mass - a large mass of ice
moraine - accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glacier
Piedmont glacier, Piedmont type of glacier - a type of glaciation characteristic of Alaska; large valley glaciers meet to form an almost stagnant sheet of ice
ice, water ice - water frozen in the solid state; "Americans like ice in their drinks"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
كُتلة جليديَّهنَهْرٌ جَليدِيّ
ledovec
gletschergletsjerjøkelbræ
liustik
jäätikkö
ledenjakglečer
gleccser
jökull
氷河
빙하
ledynas
šļūdonis
ledenik
glaciär
ธารน้ำแข็ง
khối băng trôi

glacier

[ˈglæsɪəʳ] Nglaciar m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

glacier

[ˈglæsiər ˈgleɪsiər] nglacier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

glacier

nGletscher m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

glacier

[ˈglæsɪəʳ] nghiacciaio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

glacier

(ˈglӕsiə) , ((American) ˈgleiʃər) noun
a mass of ice, formed from the snow on mountains.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

glacier

نَهْرٌ جَليدِيّ ledovec gletscher Gletscher παγετώνας glaciar jäätikkö glacier ledenjak ghiacciaio 氷河 빙하 gletsjer isbre lodowiec geleira, glaciar ледник glaciär ธารน้ำแข็ง buzul khối băng trôi 冰河
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
2008: Species persistence in northerly glacial refugia of Europe: a matter of chance or biogeographical traits?
Smallmouth Bass in Rivers of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan Represent Mitochondrial Lineages Derived from Multiple Glacial Refugia. Alanna Bailor, Catherine Clare, Emmalee Griswold, Marissa Isaac, Ben Kotrba, Kayla Terwillegar, and Cal Borden, Saginaw Valley State University
Phylogeographic insights into cryptic glacial refugia. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 23:564-571.
As a result of these improvements, glacial refugia and their role in current distributions of both plants and animals across a range of geographic scales are becoming recognized as important contributors to biogeography and phylogeography.
More recently, modelling has also been applied as a complementary tool in phylogeographic studies, as making projections at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) represents an independent method to genetic approaches for the inference of glacial refugia and paleodistribution of plant species (e.g.
Evidence for cryptic glacial refugia from North American mountain sheep mitochondrial DNA.
sylvatica forests have experienced a very recent spread in Europe, which had its origin in the Middle Holocene (MAGRI & al., 2006; VALSECCHI & al., 2008; MAGRI, 2008) starting from multiple northern glacial refugia. The Iberian Peninsula refugia have also been detected in northwestern areas (RAMIL-REGO & al., 2000), Iberian System (LOPEZ-MERINO & al., 2008) as well as Cantabrian massifs and Pyrenees (MARTINEZ ATIENZA & MORLA JUARISTI, 1992).
First, phylogeographic analysis on dice snakes (Guicking et al., 2004, 2009; Guicking and Joger, 2011; Marosi et al., 2012) indicate that they survived in only one or perhaps a few glacial refugia in southeastern Europe or in Turkey, where suitable climatic conditions persisted during glacial periods (Hewitt, 1999).
For example, hypotheses regarding the number and location of glacial refugia can be examined, as well as the investigation of dispersal routes, while range distributions and genetic structure and diversity can be compared to many other salamander species residing in the PNW.
There is an overwhelming literature on phylogeography of West Eurasian lineages which suggests that present European taxa evolved mainly from the ancestral stocks inhabiting glacial refugia such as Iberia, Italy and the Balkans (Schmitt 2007).
Macrofossil evidence for local spruce trees recovered from sites with low Picea pollen frequencies requires palynologists to reconsider how to interpret pollen records with regard to glacial refugia.
Thus, populations from these drainages may have been derived from stocks inhabiting independent glacial refugia, and differences in patterns of introgression could reflect divergence during isolation.