ice sheet

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ice sheet

n.
A large sheet of ice and snow that covers an entire region and spreads out under its own weight.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ice sheet

n
(Physical Geography) a thick layer of ice covering a large area of land for a long time, esp those in Antarctica and Greenland
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ice′ sheet`


n.
1. a thick sheet of ice covering an extensive area for a long time.
2. a glacier covering a large fraction of a continent.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ice sheet

An immense mass of ice covering a large land area.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations

ice sheet

nghiacciaio continentale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
What if a glacial sheet descended on Brum, covering everything except the top of the Rotunda, because the Rotunda would have to become our symbol of hope, Libertyesque?
The Altai-Sayan mountain region had no solid glacial sheet during the Ice Age (Gerasimov and Markov 1939), although a chain of mountain glaciers factored into the isolation of northern and southern moose populations in this area.
According to glaciologists, ice from this level represents lake water that froze to the bottom of the glacial sheet.
* Elsewhere, glacial sheets advance by incremental bits, trees fall in boreal forests, owls fall upon prey, whales intone their odes, the wind touches everything once, and again.
It is believed that the Stone Age settlement was flooded at the end of the last ice age, when glacial sheets that covered most of Europe, including Britain from the Midlands northwards, melted.
Antarctica's core of frozen earth, covered by enormous glacial sheets up to four kilometres thick, is even colder than the North Pole.
In the far north, the once balmy climate turned bitter as glacial sheets advanced over the landscape and icebergs started bobbing in the Atlantic.
Yet even the best of these models have failed to reproduce the chilly temperatures that permitted vast glacial sheets to spread over parts of North America, Europe, and Asia during the last ice age.
But most of the huge glacial sheets disappeared early in the Holocene.
In theory, the giant glacial sheets on North America and Europe during the ice age destabilized the climate; once the ice melted, the climate calmed down.