glaciation

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gla·ci·ate

 (glā′shē-āt′, -sē-)
tr.v. gla·ci·at·ed, gla·ci·at·ing, gla·ci·ates
1.
a. To cover with ice or a glacier.
b. To subject to or affect by glacial action.
2. To freeze.

[Latin glaciāre, glaciāt-, to freeze, from glaciēs, ice; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

gla′ci·a′tion n.

glaciation

1. The effects on land of ice sheets or glaciers that erode rocks and deposit the rock debris.
2. A time when ice sheets develop and spread.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glaciation - the condition of being covered with glaciers or masses of iceglaciation - the condition of being covered with glaciers or masses of ice; the result of glacial action; "Agassiz recognized marks of glaciation all over northern Europe"
environmental condition - the state of the environment
2.glaciation - the process of covering the earth with glaciers or masses of ice
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
Riss glaciation - the next-to-last Pleistocene glaciation in the Alps and the deposits laid down at that time
Saale glaciation - the next-to-last Pleistocene glaciation in northern Europe and the deposits laid down at that time
Wolstonian glaciation - the next-to-last Pleistocene glaciation in Britain and the deposits laid down at that time
Translations

glaciation

[ˌgleɪsɪˈeɪʃən] Nglaciación f

glaciation

[ˌgleɪsiˈeɪʃən] n
(= process) → glaciation f
(= period) → glaciation f

glaciation

[ˌgleɪsɪˈeɪʃn] nglaciazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
2001, Paleoproterozoic Huronian basin: product of a Wilson cycle punctuated by glaciations and a meteorite impact: Sedimentary Geology, v.
The biggest glaciations have occurred only in the last million years, beginning precisely when the 100,000-year cycle kicked in.
7 Myr ago, the panda population began to decline due to the two largest Pleistocene glaciations happened in China, and its first population bottleneck occurred at about 0.
1998) mean values of the carbon isotope curves, global bathymetry, and glaciations have been tied to the generalized graptolite zones.
Paul now has evidence that at least two, and possibly as many as five successive global glaciations occurred between 750 and 590 Ma.
Vogt notes that three of the four major glaciations coincided with times of increased plate speed.
Lyons and Planavsky argued in research published earlier in the journal Nature that a nutrient surplus associated with the extensive glaciations may have initiated intense carbon burial and oxygenation.
What we're suggesting is that the Eltanin impact may have rammed this slow-moving change forward in an instant - hurtling the world into the cycle of glaciations that characterized the next 2.
Scientists acknowledge that multiple sea level fluctuations occurred during the Pliocene-Pleistocene glaciations resulting from water being locked up in glaciers.
The study also offers new clues on the causes behind the most intense glaciations of the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly on how interactions between dust with oceanic biology influence CO2 and the climate.
These climate changes are one of the most significant shifts in Earth's history, from early Cenozoic 'greenhouse' climates to the mid- to late Cenozoic 'icehouse' that saw repeated massive glaciations of the polar regions," said Candace Major, program director in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Ocean Sciences.