glibenclamide


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Related to glibenclamide: metformin, Daonil

gli·ben·cla·mide

 (glī-bĕn′klə-mīd′, -bĕng′-)
n.

[gli-, prefix for drugs used to control hyperglycemia (variant of gly-; see glyburide) + ben(zamide), a derivative of benzoic acid; see benzoin + c(arbonyl) + am(ino)- + (sulfonam)ide.]
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In the biopharmaceutical classification system, glibenclamide, included in Class II, has a high permeability but a low solubility, because of that, the absorption of glibenclamide was limited, according to its dissolution rate.
Clobenzorex (Mexico), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), atropine, L-NAME, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), tetraethylammonium (TEA), clotrimazole and cycloheximide were dissolved in distilled water.
30] compared to glibenclamide, but glibenclamide maintained lower glycemia than the extract thereafter to the end of the study.
Traditional sulfonylureas such as chlorpropamide and glibenclamide, are either obsolete or rarely used now.
In addition, 70% of the elderly diabetics were on sulphonylurea, especially glibenclamide when they had hypoglycaemia.
HPLC and SPE methods for the simultaneous determination of glipizide and metformin, gliclazide, glimperide or glibenclamide in plasma were also developed by Atif and Abu Ruz [5, 6].
ATP] channel opener pinacidil and antagonist glibenclamide were added to the bath with a perfusion drug delivery system (Scientific Instruments, Cambridgeshire, UK).
Contractions induced by low K+ were partially antagonized by glibenclamide (3 M).
The insulin stimulatory effect of MFME was stimulated by 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine, Glibenclamide and elevated extracellular calcium.
The plants use different mechanisms for reducing blood sugar levels, which reveal properties similar to that of well-known sulfonylurea drugs like glibenclamide, which cures hypoglycemia in normal animals by stimulating insulin release from pancreatic a-cells, besides reducing hepatic clearance of insulin hormone (7,8).
Only three drug therapies were available in those times-sulfonylureas, exemplified by glibenclamide, which directly stimulate insulin secretion by the pancreas; metformin, which facilitates muscle and liver uptake of sugar; and finally, insulin.