dormouse

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dor·mouse

 (dôr′mous′)
n. pl. dor·mice (-mīs′)
Any of various small omnivorous rodents of the family Gliridae of Eurasia and Africa, having long furred tails and known for their long hibernation periods.

[Middle English, perhaps alteration (influenced by mous, mouse) of Anglo-Norman *dormeus, inclined to sleep, hibernating, from Old French dormir, to sleep; see dormant.]

dormouse

(ˈdɔːˌmaʊs)
n, pl -mice
(Animals) any small Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, esp the Eurasian Muscardinus avellanarius, resembling a mouse with a furry tail
[C15: dor-, perhaps from Old French dormir to sleep, from Latin dormīre + mouse]

dor•mouse

(ˈdɔrˌmaʊs)

n., pl. -mice (-ˌmaɪs)
any small usu. bushy-tailed Old World climbing rodent of the family Gliridae.
[1400–50; late Middle English dormowse, dormoise, perhaps Anglo-French derivative of Old French dormir to sleep (see dormant), with final syllable reanalyzed as mouse]

dormouse

- A rodent but not a mouse, it may be a corrupted form of French dormeus, "sleepy."
See also related terms for mice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weatherdormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weather
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
family Gliridae, Gliridae - dormice and other Old World forms
Glis glis, loir - large European dormouse
hazel mouse, Muscardinus avellanarius - a variety of dormouse
lerot - dormouse of southern Europe and northern Africa
Translations

dormouse

[ˈdɔːmaʊs] N (dormice (pl)) → lirón m

dormouse

[ˈdɔːrmaʊs] [dormice] [ˈdɔːrmaɪs] (pl) nloir m

dormouse

n pl <dormice> → Haselmaus f; edible or fat dormouseSiebenschläfer m; common dormouseGemeiner Siebenschläfer

dormouse

[ˈdɔːˌmaʊs] n (dormice (pl)) [ˈdɔːˌmaɪs]ghiro
References in periodicals archive ?
He also described the oldest complete skeleton of the most basal glirid Eogliravus wildi (with Christine Seiffert), which led to reconsider the affinities inside Palearctic Glirimorpha. Furthermore, he described the new pholidote Eomanis krebsi (with Thomas Martin), Leptictidium tobieni, a new Pseudorhyncocyonid (with Wighart von Koenigswald), and the marsupial Amphiperatherium goethei.