globular cluster

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globular cluster

n.
A roughly spherical, densely packed group of thousands to hundreds of thousands of stars that are gravitationally bound to one another and orbit a galaxy. Most known galaxies are orbited by numerous globular clusters.

globular cluster

n
(Astronomy) astronomy a densely populated spheroidal star cluster with the highest concentration of stars near its centre, found in the galactic halo and in other galaxies

glob·u·lar cluster

(glŏb′yə-lər)
A dense system of very old stars that has a more or less spherical structure. Globular clusters contain from ten thousand to one million stars. Compare open cluster.
References in periodicals archive ?
The telltale sign of the galaxy's state lies in the ancient globular clusters of stars that swarm around it.
Giant galaxies like the NGC 1277 generally contain both metal-rich (red in appearance) and metal-poor (blue in appearance) globular clusters.
The new finding helps in understanding the formation of globular clusters and the evolution of black holes and binary systems vital in the context of understanding gravitational wave sources," Giesers said.
It's the best placed and most popular of all globular clusters for observers at mid-northern latitudes and may even be the most popular deep-sky object of any kind except for winter's M42, the Great Orion Nebula.
Globular clusters orbit most galaxies, including our own Milky Way.
He also made observations of the globular clusters [omega] Cen and 47 Tuc.
We show how the relationship between globular clusters and dark matter depends on the distance from the center of the galaxy grouping," Karla Alamo-Martinez of the Center for Radio Astronomy and Astrophysics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Morelia.
The LMC is rich with many fascinating objects, including globular clusters, planetary nebulae and open clusters.
Globular clusters typically contain tens to hundreds of thousands of fiery suns.
The two greatest globular clusters lie in the southern hemisphere, Omega Centauri and 47 Tucana.
Because of their close interactions with neighboring stars, pulsars in globular clusters have elongated orbits, a shape that makes it much easier to infer the mass of these superdense stars.
Papers from joint discussions at a July 2003 meeting are organized in sections on non-electromagnetic windows for astrophysics, mercury, magnetic fields and helicity in the sun and heliosphere, astrophysical impact of abundances in globular clusters, and white dwarfs.