glomus

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glo·mus

 (glō′məs)
n. pl. glom·er·a (glŏm′ər-ə)
A small body, such as the carotid body, consisting of an anastomosis between fine arterioles and veins and supporting structures.

[Latin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glomus

(ˈɡləʊməs)
n
(Anatomy) anatomy a small anastomosis in an artery or vein
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

glo·mus

n. L. glomo, bola, grupo de arteriolas conectadas directamente a las venas, ricas en inervación.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Glomus tumours are rare, benign, vascular neoplasms arising from glomus body which is a contractile neuromyoarterial structure found in the reticular dermis.
As the name indicates, the tumor arises from the glomus body, which is an arteriovenous anastomosis, functioning without an intermediary capillary bed (1).
Glomus tumors originate from smooth muscle cells implicated in the thermoregulation within the glomus body, an arteriovenous anastomosis located in the dermis [1].
Our decision to use Nancy's concepts in framing our analysis of environmental education discourses stems in part from our perception of their generativity for 'resisting becoming a glomus body' in theorising our embodied participation in educational research (see A.
Glomus tumors are thought to arise from the glomus body, which consists of an arterio-venous shunt surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue.
Glomus tumor is a rare vascular neoplasm derived from the cells of the glomus body, a specialized arteriovenous shunt involved in temperature regulation.
Glomus tumors were thought to represent hyperplasia or overgrowth of the glomus body; later, they were considered neoplastic growths or tumorlike, mesodermal developmental disorder.