glottal stop

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glottal stop

n.
A speech sound produced by a momentary complete closure of the glottis, followed by an explosive release, as in the middle of the interjection uh-oh or between the two i's in some pronunciations of Hawaii.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glottal stop

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a plosive speech sound produced as the sudden onset of a vowel in several languages, such as German, by first tightly closing the glottis and then allowing the air pressure to build up in the trachea before opening the glottis, causing the air to escape with force
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

glot′tal stop′


n.
a plosive consonant whose occlusion and release are accomplished chiefly at the glottis, as in the Scottish articulation of the t-sound of little, bottle, etc.
[1885–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glottal stop - a stop consonant articulated by releasing pressure at the glottis; as in the sudden onset of a vowel
occlusive, plosive, plosive consonant, plosive speech sound, stop consonant, stop - a consonant produced by stopping the flow of air at some point and suddenly releasing it; "his stop consonants are too aspirated"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

glottal stop

n (Phon) → Knacklaut m, → Stimmritzenverschlusslaut m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
* Besides the glotal stop, modern Hawaiian uses the macron, or "kahako," a line over certain vowels that lengthens the sound.