gnu

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gnu

 (no͞o, nyo͞o)
n.
Either of two large African antelopes (Connochaetes gnou or C. taurinus) having a drooping mane and beard, a long tufted tail, and curved horns in both sexes. Also called wildebeest.

[Probably from Dutch gnoe, from Xhosa i-ngu, white-tailed gnu, from San !nu, black wildebeest.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gnu

(nuː)
n, pl gnus or gnu
(Animals) either of two sturdy antelopes, Connochaetes taurinus (brindled gnu) or the much rarer C. gnou (white-tailed gnu), inhabiting the savannas of Africa, having an oxlike head and a long tufted tail. Also called: wildebeest
[C18: from Xhosa nqu]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gnu

(nu, nyu)

n., pl. gnus, (esp. collectively) gnu.
either of two stocky, oxlike African antelopes, the silvery gray Connochaetestaurinus or the black C. gnou.
Also called wildebeest.
[1770–80; Khoikhoi, first recorded as t'gnu]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gnu - large African antelope having a head with horns like an ox and a long tufted tailgnu - large African antelope having a head with horns like an ox and a long tufted tail
antelope - graceful Old World ruminant with long legs and horns directed upward and backward; includes gazelles; springboks; impalas; addax; gerenuks; blackbucks; dik-diks
Connochaetes, genus Connochaetes - African antelopes: gnus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نو: حيوان أفريقي يُشْبِه البَقَر
pakůň hřívnatý
gnu
gnugnuu
gnú
gnÿr
gnu
gnu
gnu
gnu
gnu
Güney Afrika antilobu

gnu

[nuː] N (gnus or gnu (pl)) → ñu m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gnu

[ˈnuː] ngnou m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

gnu

nGnu nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gnu

[nuː] ngnu m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

gnu

(nuː) plurals gnus ~gnu noun
a type of large African antelope.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Smith, two others, the hippopotamus, the giraffe, the bos caffer -- as large as a full-grown bull, and the elan -- but little less, two zebras, and the quaccha, two gnus, and several antelopes even larger than these latter animals.
But those who were gathered together shivered with fear when they heard their words, for they knew well that many a man would be switched with the gnu's tail before the sun sank once more.
For till this hour, when a man was swept with the gnu's tail of the Isanusi that was the instant of his death.
The trend to GNUs is not necessarily a new trend; what is significant is that it has recently become a popular option in resolving election disputes.
The pieces have been described as "quirky and ingenious" moving artworks which highlight recycling and ecological concerns and include Having A Whale Of A Time, created from welded steel and foam rubber and Canoodling Canoe Gnus, a 16ft Canadian canoe containing two gnus going for a romantic afternoon paddle.
The local newspaper made it headline news: MARY CRIST MISSES AN HAPPY GNUS EAR!
Well, there are two terms you can use for when gnus get together.
In his article "No Gnus Is Good Gnus" in the February 2002 Word Ways, Jim Puder showed what might have happened to some famous palindromes if their authors had been "suffering from the gnus", for example, A man, a pung, a gnu--Panama.
The fauna is strange indeed--predatory warlags, glacier worms that hunt hibernating creatures, and six-legged gnus used as beasts of burden.
see, the Duke of Cumberland and his men were clearing the Highlands and as well as the people they got rid of all our gnus."
"Even more remarkable is the fact that it is most closely related to extinct species of Araucariaceae [a gnus of South American and Australian pines] found in the fossil record in southern Australia about 50 to 150 million years ago."