Goidelic


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Goi·del·ic

 (goi-dĕl′ĭk)
n.
A subdivision of the Insular Celtic languages that includes Irish Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Gaels.
2. Of or relating to Goidelic.

[From Old Irish Goídil, Gael, possibly from Old Welsh -guoidel, Gwyddel.]

Goidelic

(ɡɔɪˈdɛlɪk) or

Goidhelic

;

Gadhelic

n
1. (Languages) the N group of Celtic languages, consisting of Irish Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx. Compare Brythonic
2. (Historical Terms) the N group of Celtic languages, consisting of Irish Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx. Compare Brythonic
adj
3. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of this group of languages
4. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of this group of languages
[C19: from Old Irish Goidel a Celt, from Old Welsh gwyddel, from gwydd savage]

Goi•del•ic

(gɔɪˈdɛl ɪk)
n.
1. the subgroup of modern Celtic languages represented by Irish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx, all descended from the speech of Ireland in the early Middle Ages.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Goidelic or its speakers.
[1880–1885; < Old Irish Goídil Gael + -ic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Goidelic - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and ScotlandGoidelic - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and Scotland
Celtic, Celtic language - a branch of the Indo-European languages that (judging from inscriptions and place names) was spread widely over Europe in the pre-Christian era
Irish Gaelic, Irish - the Celtic language of Ireland
Scots Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic - the Gaelic of Scotland
Manx - the ancient Gaelic formerly spoken on the Isle of Man; the language is sometimes used on ceremonial occasions
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, the rise of Iron Age ritual centers in the first centuries BC may also have been a vehicle for language shift and stimulated the consolidation of the Goidelic language.
xv) to 'the more traditional Celtic Studies approach to the Gaelic language'--which I take to mean historical and comparative study in a diachronic Gaelic or Goidelic framework--and claim that the Companion will 're-affirm the links' between this approach and 'recent innovations' in language study.
At Vinea, they'll be talking Uisge Beatha ("water of life" to the non Goidelic speakers) , flavour, stills and barrels over a glass and some nibbles.
Such work should also cover the question of when the proto Celtic language they probably spoke split into the Goidelic (q) and Brythonic (p), namely Irish Gallic and Welsh.