Gonne


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Gonne

 (gŏn, gŭn), Maud 1866?-1953.
Irish patriot and actress. A leader of the Irish independence movement, she was a founder (1906) of Sinn Fein.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gonne - Irish patriot and a founder of the Sinn Fein (1865-1953)Gonne - Irish patriot and a founder of the Sinn Fein (1865-1953)
References in periodicals archive ?
Some topics include the legend of Napoleon in Irish history, Ireland in 19th-century French thought, John Patrick Leonard and the Irish colony in Paris, Maud Gonne and Irish revolutionary agitation in Paris, and Ludovic Naudeau and the Irish War of Independence.
According to the poet speaker, Maud Gonne has "taught to ignorant men most violent ways" (91).
Open up hell-gates anonne, ye prynces of pyne everychon, that Godes Sonne may in gonne, And the king of blys.
The End Of Romance will focus on the Irish writer's 1917 trip to Normandy to try to propose to nationalist Maud Gonne.
This context then receives an added urgency and relevance when Yeats famously meets Maud Gonne, the beautiful and violent Irish revolutionary for whom Yeats yearned much of his life and whose feelings for him did not quite amount to love.
Look out for the two huge murals, one of WB himself and the other, of Maud Gonne, the beautiful revolutionary who captivated him.
Ron i yng nghanol darllen am fywyd Maud Gonne, a'r Dyn Fej wedi ymgolli yn hanes bywyd Collins, felly roedden ni yn ddwfn ym 1916 fel ag yr oedd.
Misspelling people's names seems even more egregious; yet Grant manages to misspell the names of Mary MacSwiney (174), Donal O'Donoghue (156), and even of Maud Gonne (145).
Thus it was that the early hand-held gonne was superseded by the matchlock harquebus, which was replaced with the snaphaunce and dog lock muskets.
One day a Miss Maud Gonne arrived in a hansom at Bedford Park, where the Yeats family lived.
18) The Rising was chiefly promoted by the extreme Nationalists of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, a group of Nationalists of whom Yeats really knew very little because they had come into prominence since the days when he and Maud Gonne were actively engaged in the Gaelic movement.
Other one-of-a-kind experiences include lunch at Rosnaree, home of Aisling Law, great-granddaughter of Maud Gonne, Irish revolutionary and great love and muse of William Rutler Yeats, with whom she founded the Abbey Theatre.