Goodwin


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Goodwin

(ˈɡʊdwɪn)
n
(Biography) Fred(erick Anderson). born 1958, Scottish banker; CEO of Royal Bank of Scotland (2001–2009); losses in 2008 of £24 billion led to the bank's effective nationalization; his knighthood (2004) was annulled in 2012
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
'Oh, don't leave me--don't leave me, Goodwin,' murmured Mrs.
At this affecting appeal, Goodwin got up a little domestic tragedy of her own, and shed tears copiously.
'Never, ma'am--never,' said Goodwin.'Oh, sir, you should be careful--you should indeed; you don't know what harm you may do missis; you'll be sorry for it one day, I know--I've always said so.'
'It would certainly serve him right, ma'am,' said Goodwin.
'Certainly, ma'am,' replied Goodwin. 'No man as is a man, ma'am, could refuse to do it.'
Pott was so overcome at the bare idea of having ever been suspected, that she was half a dozen times on the very verge of a relapse, and most unquestionably would have gone off, had it not been for the indefatigable efforts of the assiduous Goodwin, and repeated entreaties for pardon from the conquered Pott; and finally, when that unhappy individual had been frightened and snubbed down to his proper level, Mrs.
Simpson was absent from the home circle for the moment because he had exchanged the Widow Rideout's sleigh for Joseph Goodwin's plough.
I am the master-shipman of this yellow cog, and my name is Goodwin Hawtayne.
And yet Goodwin Hawtayne is not the man to stand back when his fellows are for pressing forward.
So urgent was Sir Nigel on the shore, and so prompt was Goodwin Hawtayne on the cog, that Sir Oliver Buttesthorn had scarce swallowed his last scallop ere the peal of the trumpet and clang of nakir announced that all was ready and the anchor drawn.
Their leader, Goodwin Hawtayne, stood upon the poop and talked with Sir Nigel, casting his eye up sometimes at the swelling sail, and then glancing back at the two seamen who held the tiller.
"That we shall prove," said Goodwin Hawtayne; "but it would be well, ere they close with us, to raise up the mantlets and pavises as a screen against their bolts." He shouted a hoarse order, and his seamen worked swiftly and silently, heightening the bulwarks and strengthening them.