Banks

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bank 1

 (băngk)
n.
1. A piled-up mass, as of snow or clouds; a heap: a bank of thunderclouds.
2. A steep natural incline.
3. An artificial embankment.
4. often banks
a. The slope of land adjoining a body of water, especially adjoining a river, lake, or channel.
b. A large elevated area of a sea floor.
5. Games The cushion of a billiard or pool table.
6. The lateral inward tilting, as of a motor vehicle or an aircraft, in turning or negotiating a curve.
v. banked, bank·ing, banks
v.tr.
1. To border or protect with a ridge or embankment.
2. To pile up; amass: banked earth along the wall.
3. To cover (a fire), as with ashes or fresh fuel, to ensure continued low burning.
4. To construct with a slope rising to the outside edge: The turns on the racetrack were steeply banked.
5.
a. To tilt (an aircraft) laterally and inwardly in flight.
b. To tilt (a motor vehicle) laterally and inwardly when negotiating a curve.
6. Games To strike (a billiard ball) so that it rebounds from the cushion of the table.
7. Sports To play (a ball or puck) in such a way as to make it glance off a surface, such as a backboard or wall.
v.intr.
1. To rise in or take the form of a bank.
2. To tilt an aircraft or a motor vehicle laterally when turning.

[Middle English, of Scandinavian origin.]

bank 2

 (băngk)
n.
1.
a. A business establishment in which money is kept for saving or commercial purposes or is invested, supplied for loans, or exchanged.
b. The offices or building in which such an establishment is located.
2. Games
a. The funds of a gambling establishment.
b. The funds held by a dealer or banker in certain games, especially gambling games.
c. The reserve pieces, cards, chips, or play money in some games, such as poker, from which the players may draw.
3.
a. A supply or stock for future or emergency use: a grain bank.
b. Medicine A supply of human fluids or tissues, such as blood, sperm, or skin, that is stored in a facility for future use.
4. A place of safekeeping or storage: a computer's memory bank.
v. banked, bank·ing, banks
v.tr.
1. To deposit in a bank.
2. To store for future use.
v.intr.
1. To transact business with a bank or maintain a bank account.
2. To operate a bank.
Phrasal Verb:
bank on
To have confidence in; rely on.

[Middle English banke, from French banque, from Old Italian banca, bench, moneychanger's table, from Old High German banc.]

bank 3

 (băngk)
n.
1. A set of similar or matched things arranged in a row, especially:
a. A set of elevators.
b. A row of keys on a keyboard.
2. Nautical
a. A bench for rowers in a galley.
b. A row of oars in a galley.
3. Printing The lines of type under a headline.
tr.v. banked, bank·ing, banks
To arrange or set up in a row: "Every street was banked with purple-blooming trees" (Doris Lessing).

[Middle English, bench, from Old French banc, from Late Latin bancus, of Germanic origin.]

Banks

 (băngks), Sir Joseph 1743-1820.
British botanist noted for his circumnavigation of the globe (1768-1771) with James Cook, during which he collected and cataloged numerous specimens of plants and animals.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Banks

(bæŋks)
n
1. (Biography) Iain (Menzies). 1954–2013, Scottish novelist and science fiction writer. His novels include The Wasp Factory (1984), The Crow Road (1992), and The Steep Approach to Garbadale (2007); science-fiction (under the name Iain M. Banks) includes Look to Windward (2000)
2. (Biography) Sir Joseph. 1743–1820, British botanist and explorer: circumnavigated the world with James Cook (1768–71)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Banks

(bæŋks)

n.
Sir Joseph, 1734–1820, English naturalist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Banks - English botanist who accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage to the Pacific Ocean (1743-1820)Banks - English botanist who accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage to the Pacific Ocean (1743-1820)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a young girl, I spent a great deal of my life in the back garden being Gordon Banks to my brother's Martin Chivers.
FOOTBALL contracts signed by the game's greatest goalkeeper, Gordon Banks, have sold at auction for close to PS9,000.
Contracts signed by World Cup hero Gordon Banks sold for thousands of pounds as they went under the hammer.
Gordon Banks "There was a huge amount of interest in these - no wonder, as we are talking about a piece of history from one of the greatest goalkeepers we've ever had - and there was good competition between bidders intent on scoring the winning goal here.
Gordon Banks in action and left, his football contracts
DAVID BECKHAM is ready to kick off his MLS dream with Inter Miami in the stadium made famous by George Best and Gordon Banks.
WHAT a great send off the legendary Gordon Banks received last week.
To me Gordon Banks was the greatest goalkeeper ever.
Leicester City goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel and Burnley goalkeeper Joe Hart carry the coffin during the funeral service for Gordon Banks at Stoke Minster
Many thousands lined the streets of Stoke on Monday to pay homage to their adopted son Gordon Banks, who was a global footballing icon but to those who knew and loved him, something far more precious than that: a humble, down-to-earth man who had time for everyone.
ENGLAND World Cup heroes turned out yesterday to pay their respects to the team's legendary goalkeeper Gordon Banks.
NORTH East football legends the Charlton brothers were among those saying goodbye to Gordon Banks yesterday.