Gothicism


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Goth·i·cism

 (gŏth′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The use or imitation of Gothic style, as in architecture.
2. A barbarous or crude manner or style.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Gothicism

(ˈɡɒθɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Terms) conformity to, use of, or imitation of the Gothic style, esp in architecture
2. crudeness of manner or style
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Goth•i•cism

(ˈgɒθ əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. conformity or devotion to the Gothic style.
2. the principles and techniques of the Gothic style.
3. (sometimes l.c.) barbarism; crudeness.
[1700–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gothicism

a style in fictional literature characterized by gloomy settings, violent or grotesque action, and a mood of decay, degeneration, and decadence. — gothicist, n. — gothic, adj.
See also: Literary Style
the general term employed to denote the several phases of European architecture in the period 1100-1530 that employ the pointed arch, or their imitations.
See also: Architecture
the principles of the paintings, sculptures, stained glass, mosaics, and book illustrations of the period 1200-1450, embracing several disparate styles and emphases. — Gothicist, n.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a collection of four different pieces of fiction, each inspired by Victorian England's Gothicism and narrated by those with strong connections to love, death and spirituality.
It is this correlation of morality and politics built through Gothicism that informs Bond's radical political and philosophical vision and which he translates into dramatic medium.
They are motivated by a confidence to divulge hoary secrets, a calm Gothicism, an acceptance that behind the everyday, especially everyday language, one can feel the animal warmth of the Other Side.
(7) With these connections in mind, we may reconsider Gales's meditation on the filthy floor of the Yorikke--that it encodes the whole history of mankind stretching to the Phoenicians and going all the way back to pre-civilization--as a particularly messianic figuration of the novel's expressionism, and its gothicism.
Joseph Young is a combined teaching and research fellow in English literature at Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, where he is pursuing his scholarly interests in the modern fantasy tradition, Gothicism, intellectual history and expressions of idealism in post-Enlightenment literature.
Earlier eighteenth-century magic lantern innovations produced phantasmagorias, ghostly shows that promoted audiences' desire for gothicism, which Brown amply illustrates with discussions of successful phantasmagorists Etienne-Gaspard Robert, Paul De Philipstahl, and Mark Lonsdale.
In addition to the many studies about Twilight's peculiar mixture of genre conventions, especially the Gothic and the teen romance, my reading aims toward a deeper examination of the functioning and implications of the reversal of Gothicism. So far the series' inversion of the Gothic fascination with the broken and the unresolved has yet to be fully explained.
Notwithstanding the divisions between Pinkertonians and their opponents on the Pictish question, Gothicism of the sort championed by both schools remained the standard interpretation of Anglo-Scottish history, ethnology, philology and literature throughout the nineteenth century.
Edgar Allan Poe: Beyond Gothicism. Delaware: University of Delaware Press, 2011.
(7) Those scholars who come nearest to addressing what I read in Voyage in the Dark as the novel's Gothicism restrict their analysis to a specifically Caribbean framework by examining the various references in Rhys's oeuvre to obeah, the Afro-Caribbean system of occult belief and ritualism practiced on her home island.