Gottsched


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Gottsched

(German ˈɡɔtʃɛd)
n
(Biography) Johann Christoph. 1700–66, German critic, dramatist, and translator
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The critics went on to contend that his music was unnecessarily difficult and seemed more suited to please the eyes with virtuosic physical spectacle rather than the ears (see, for example, the account of Luise and her husband, Johann Christoph Gottsched, in chap.
In Chapter 6 the reader is invited to slide down the social scale to a couple whose main assets were intellectual--Johann Christoph Gottsched and his wife Luise (nee Kulmus) Gottsched.
Luise Gottsched (1713-1762) was largely known as a dramatist and one of Germany's prominent women of letters, and much has been written about her accomplishments in that field, however, Brown (lecturer, U.
In one issue of the famous moral weekly Der Biedermann (The Honest Man), from September 15, 1727, for example, Johann Christoph Gottsched included a letter purportedly from a reader who suggested that university professors be replaced by gallant, learned women.
This article provides the first overview of Luise Gottsched's satirical writings and places them in their literary and historical context.
Brown attributes this dominance of character to the Horatian-inflected neoclassical reading of Aristotle that arose during the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, promoted by writers such as Rene Rapin and Johann Christoph Gottsched. "Aristotle clearly subordinates character to plot," Brown writes, but "he says enough about character for it to be substantially reinterpreted in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries" (57).
The third, and briefest, part of Poetik und Rhetorik reviews the epochal shift in German reflections on language and literature that occurred in the first half of the eighteenth century, summarizing the stakes of polemical exchanges between Johann Christoph Gottsched, whom scholars have traditionally viewed as the Figur des Abschlusses alterer Entwicklungen, and his contemporary Johann Jakob Breitinger, whose reflections represent einer der Schritte hin zu einem epistemologischen Umschwung, weg von der Poetik hin zu Hermeneutik und Literaturwissenschaft.
This book does some creditable spadework by showing how Luise Gottsched has been 'edited out' of German literary history and read the wrong way by not being seen in the context of her times, e.g., accused of a lack of originality, where originality was not the criterion by which much of her literary output was meant to be assessed.
Consider the following passage: "Though trained in the neoclassicism of eighteenth-and nineteenth-century authors such as Gottsched, Lessing, Klopstock, Wieland, Voss, A.W.
Kord's essay examines the correspondence of (amongst others) Luise Gottsched and Caroline Pichler with their female friends.