Götz von Berlichingen

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Götz von Berlichingen

(German ɡœts fɔn ˈbɛrlɪçɪŋən)
n
(Biography) See Berlichingen
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Der lasst ein Wort erklingen wie Gotz von Berlichingen. The merchants and the businessmen are with profit and haggling the "Hero's" adversaries.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, wrote a drama on Gotz von Berlichingen
As stated in the previous article of this series, , the German mercenary Gotz von Berlichingen had in 1508 a pair of technologically advanced iron hands made after he lost his right arm in the Battle of Landshut.
Plays such as Goethe's Gotz von Berlichingen, which Mathas analyzes in the fourth chapter, reflect the narcissistic fantasy of a "natural" body as well as a vision of an intact German nation that did not yet exist.
Thus we find, in volume 10, articles about specific texts by Goethe -- Horst Lange discusses Gotz von Berlichingen from the perspective of political theory (particularly that of Hobbes); Elizabeth Powers examines 'Der Wanderer', seeking to show that 'the artist, in order to perpetuate himself through his works, must escape poetic imitation, which in this poem is expressed by the woman's nurturing function', even though the woman -- 'the idyll, which itself is a stand-in for the literary inheritance' -- 'represents the ultimate souce of man's -- the artist's - creativity (pp.
General readers of German history may well have heard of Wilhelm von Grumbach, the last of the Franconian noble feuders; many readers will have heard of his predecessors, Franz von Sickingen and Gotz von Berlichingen; but who, except a regional specialist, has ever heard of any Franconian knight born after 1550?
Gustafson's examination of Male Desire in Goethe's Gotz von Berlichingen' argues that, in Lacanian terms, this play 'implies that the subject enters language through the illusory fantasy of and identification with a perfect, imitable male/paternal imago' (p.
5-43; Helgard Ulmschneider, Gotz von Berlichingen: Ein adeliges Leben der deutschen Renaissance (Sigmaringen, 1974), p.
In 1773 he provided the turbulent Sturm und Drang movement with its first major drama, Gotz von Berlichingen, which he wrote in conscious imitation of William Shakespeare, and in 1774 with its first novel, Die Leiden des jungen Werthers(Sorrows of Young Werther, The).