gourd

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gourd

 (gôrd, go͝ord)
n.
1. Any of several trailing or climbing cucurbit plants bearing fruits with a hard rind, especially Lagenaria siceraria and a variety of Cucurbita pepo.
2.
a. The fruit of such a plant, sometimes of unusual shape or color.
b. The dried and hollowed-out shell of one of these fruits, often used as a container or as a decorative object.
Idiom:
off/out of (one's) gourd Slang
Very foolish; crazy.

[Middle English gourde, from Anglo-Norman, ultimately from Latin cucurbita.]

gourd

(ɡʊəd)
n
1. (Plants) the fruit of any of various cucurbitaceous or similar plants, esp the bottle gourd and some squashes, whose dried shells are used for ornament, drinking cups, etc
2. (Plants) any plant that bears this fruit. See also sour gourd, dishcloth gourd, calabash
3. (Plants) a bottle or flask made from the dried shell of the bottle gourd
4. (Ceramics) a small bottle shaped like a gourd
[C14: from Old French gourde, ultimately from Latin cucurbita]
ˈgourdˌlike adj
ˈgourd-ˌshaped adj

gourd

(gɔrd, goʊrd, gʊərd)

n.
1. the hard-shelled fruit of any plant belonging to the gourd family, esp. of the genus Cucurbita, made into bowls, ladles, etc.
2. a plant bearing such a fruit.
3. a dried and excavated gourd shell used as a bottle, dipper, flask, etc.
Idioms:
out of or off one's gourd, Slang. out of one's mind; crazy.
[1275–1325; Middle English gourd(e), courde < Anglo-French (Old French cöorde) < Latin cucurbita]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gourd - bottle made from the dried shell of a bottle gourdgourd - bottle made from the dried shell of a bottle gourd
bottle - a glass or plastic vessel used for storing drinks or other liquids; typically cylindrical without handles and with a narrow neck that can be plugged or capped
2.gourd - any of numerous inedible fruits with hard rinds
calabash - round gourd of the calabash tree
fruit - the ripened reproductive body of a seed plant
3.gourd - any vine of the family Cucurbitaceae that bears fruits with hard rindsgourd - any vine of the family Cucurbitaceae that bears fruits with hard rinds
Cucurbitaceae, family Cucurbitaceae, gourd family - a family of herbaceous vines (such as cucumber or melon or squash or pumpkin)
buffalo gourd, calabazilla, Cucurbita foetidissima, Missouri gourd, prairie gourd vine, wild pumpkin, prairie gourd - perennial vine of dry parts of central and southwestern United States and Mexico having small hard mottled green inedible fruit
melon vine, melon - any of various fruit of cucurbitaceous vines including: muskmelons; watermelons; cantaloupes; cucumbers
Ecballium elaterium, exploding cucumber, squirting cucumber, touch-me-not - Mediterranean vine having oblong fruit that when ripe expels its seeds and juice violently when touched
bottle gourd, Lagenaria siceraria, calabash - Old World climbing plant with hard-shelled bottle-shaped gourds as fruits
balsam apple, Momordica balsamina - a tropical Old World flowering vine with red or orange warty fruit
balsam pear, Momordica charantia - tropical Old World vine with yellow-orange fruit
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Translations
يَقْطين، قَرع
tykev
græskar
kaalikalebassi
dísztök
grasker
ヒョウタン瓢箪
moliūgas
ķirbis
kalebassskalle
su kabağısukabağı

gourd

[gʊəd] Ncalabaza f

gourd

[ˈgɔːrd ˈgʊərd] ngourde f, calebasse f

gourd

nFlaschenkürbis m; (dried) → Kürbisflasche f

gourd

[gʊəd] nzucca

gourd

(guəd) , ((American) go:rd) noun
a type of large fruit, or the plant on which it grows.
References in classic literature ?
It happened one day that I passed a tree under which lay several dry gourds, and catching one up I amused myself with scooping out its contents and pressing into it the juice of several bunches of grapes which hung from every bush.
Infringing companies sprang up like gourds in the night.
They bore in their girdles small gourds, coated with tallow, and several other articles of witchcraft, all of them, by-the-way, most professionally filthy.
Umbopa, assegai in hand and a rifle across his shoulders, looked out fixedly across the desert a few paces ahead of us; while the hired natives, with the gourds of water, and Ventvogel, were gathered in a little knot behind.
Pots of food and gourds of drink were being passed about among the audience.
I have three gourds which I fill with water and take back to my cave against the long nights.
And yet, it was not long after this that the using of gourds for storing water became the general practice of the horde.
I gave him directions to have several gourds of water and a lot of yams, cocoa-nuts, and sweet potatoes.
I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
That while he tendered to Alice the gourd of sweet water, and the venison in a trencher, neatly carved from the knot of the pepperidge, with sufficient courtesy, in performing the same offices to her sister, his dark eye lingered on her rich, speaking countenance.
The woman, who was very handsome, waited till my mother had finished her angry words; then she looked up and spoke slowly, "There is a cow by you with milk dropping from its udder; will you not even give me and my boy a gourd of milk?
ADAM, earths hallowd mould, Of God inspir'd, small store will serve, where store, All seasons, ripe for use hangs on the stalk; Save what by frugal storing firmness gains To nourish, and superfluous moist consumes: But I will haste and from each bough and break, Each Plant & juciest Gourd will pluck such choice To entertain our Angel guest, as hee Beholding shall confess that here on Earth God hath dispenst his bounties as in Heav'n.