governor

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gov·er·nor

 (gŭv′ər-nər)
n.
1. Abbr. Gov. A person who governs, especially:
a. The chief executive of a state in the United States.
b. An official appointed to govern a colony or territory.
c. A member of a governing body.
2. The manager or administrative head of an organization, business, or institution.
3. Abbr. Gov. A military commandant.
4. Chiefly British Used as a form of polite address for a man.
5. A feedback device on a machine or engine that is used to provide automatic control, as of speed, pressure, or temperature.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

governor

(ˈɡʌvənə)
n
1. a person who governs
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the ruler or chief magistrate of a colony, province, etc
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the representative of the Crown in a British colony
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Brit the senior administrator or head of a society, prison, etc
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the chief executive of any state in the US
6. (Mechanical Engineering) a device that controls the speed of an engine, esp by regulating the supply of fuel, etc, either to limit the maximum speed or to maintain a constant speed
7. (Grammar) grammar
a. a word in a phrase or clause that is the principal item and gives the function of the whole, as hat in the big red hat
b. (as modifier): a governor noun.
8. informal Brit a name or title of respect for a father, employer, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gov•er•nor

(ˈgʌv ər nər, -ə nər)

n.
1. the executive head of a state in the U.S.
2. a person charged with the direction or control of an institution, society, etc.: the governors of a bank; the governor of a prison.
3. a ruler or chief magistrate appointed to govern a province, town, fort, or the like.
4. a device for maintaining uniform speed in a machine, engine, etc., regardless of changes of load, as by regulating the supply of fuel or working fluid.
5. Brit. Informal.
a. one's father.
b. one's employer.
c. any man of superior rank or status.
[1250–1300; Middle English governour < Old French governeor, gouverneur < Latin gubernātōrem, acc. of gubernātor=gubernā(re) to steer, govern + -tor -tor]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.governor - the head of a state governmentgovernor - the head of a state government  
bey - the governor of a district or province in the Ottoman Empire
eparch - the governor or prefect of an eparchy in ancient Greece
governor general - a governor of high rank
military governor - the head of a government established by the military (as in a defeated country)
nabob, nawab - a governor in India during the Mogul empire
politician - a leader engaged in civil administration
proconsul - a provincial governor of consular rank in the Roman Republic and Roman Empire
satrap - a governor of a province in ancient Persia
viceroy, vicereine - governor of a country or province who rules as the representative of his or her king or sovereign
2.governor - a control that maintains a steady speed in a machine (as by controlling the supply of fuel)
controller, control - a mechanism that controls the operation of a machine; "the speed controller on his turntable was not working properly"; "I turned the controls over to her"
flywheel - regulator consisting of a heavy wheel that stores kinetic energy and smooths the operation of a reciprocating engine
timer - a regulator that activates or deactivates a mechanism at set times
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

governor

noun leader, administrator, ruler, head, minister, director, manager, chief, officer, executive, boss (informal), commander, controller, supervisor, superintendent, mandarin, comptroller, functionary, overseer, baas (S. African) He was governor of the province in the late 1970s.
Related words
adjective gubernatorial
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
حاكِمعُضو لَجنَة حاكِمَهوالي إقْليم، حاكِم منطقَه
guvernérregulátorčlen správní rady
bestyrelsesmedlemdirektørguvernørpræsidiemedlem
kuvernöörimaaherra
igazgatótanács tagja
ríkisstjóristjórnandi; stjórnarmeîlimurlandstjóri, nÿlendustjóri
regulator
člen správnej radyguvernér
direktorguverner
valiyönetim kurulu üyesi

governor

[ˈgʌvənəʳ]
A. N
1. [of colony, state etc] → gobernador(a) m/f
2. (esp Brit) [of prison] → director(a) m/f
3. (Brit) [of school] → miembro mf del consejo
4. (Brit) (= boss) → jefe m, patrón m; (= father) → viejo m
thanks, governor!¡gracias, jefe!
5. (Mech) → regulador m
B. CPD governor general N (Brit) → gobernador(a) m/f general
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

governor

[ˈgʌvərr] n
[colony, state, bank] → gouverneur m
[school] → membre m du conseil d'établissement; [hospital] → membre m du conseil d'administration
(British) [prison] → directeur/trice m/fGovernor-General [ˌgʌvərrˈdʒɛnərəl] n (British)gouverneur m général
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

governor

n
(of colony, state etc)Gouverneur(in) m(f)
(esp Brit, of bank, prison) → Direktor(in) m(f); (of school)˜ Mitglied ntdes Schulbeirats; the (board of) governorsder Vorstand; (of bank also)das Direktorium; (of school)˜ der Schulbeirat
(Brit inf: = boss) → Chef m (inf); (= father)alter Herr (inf)
(Mech) → Regler m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

governor

[ˈgʌvənəʳ] n
a. (of colony, state, bank) → governatore m; (director, of school, hospital) → membro del consiglio di amministrazione (Brit) (of prison) → direttore/trice
b. (of engine) → controllo automatico della velocità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

government

(ˈgavəmənt) noun
1. the people who rule a country or state. the British Government.
2. the way in which a country or state is ruled. Democracy is one form of government.
3. the act or process of governing.
governmental (gavnˈmentl) adjective
ˈgovernor noun
1. in the United States, the head of a state. the Governor of Ohio.
2. a member of the committee of people who govern a school, hospital etc. He is on the board of governors.
3. a person who governs a province or colony.
ˈgovernorship noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
La negativa se plantea en contra de la mobocracy (10) que tanto desdeno Governour Morris porque hay que pensar en lo que es mejor para el gobierno y para los negocios.
For else, what Governour would spend his dayes, In enuious trauell, (10) for the publike good?
Sir, I'm your most obedient!--I know your whole Generation,--had not you an Unkle that was Governour of the Leeward Islands some Years ago?" (5.7.129-31).
Sir Thomas Elyot, author of The Boke called the Governour, spoke of Pasquill's origins in the epistle to his dialogue entitled Pasquyll the Playne (London, Thomas Berthelet, 1540) [STC 2nd 7673], See Thomas Elyot, "Thomas Eliot to the gentle Reders," Pasquyll the Playne (London, Thomas Berthelet, 1540) [STC 2nd 7673], A2.
(75) Like David, Mary confirms Henry's status as God's chosen ('assigned / Of His Grace to be governour of His peoplez proteccion') and also relates her settled presence in a faithful York ('thy people hath me muche in affeccion') such that Henry is emotionally and theologically blackmailed into aiding the city.
Instead of collecting all authority into one center, that of the nation, they have established different bodies; a body of representatives, a council, and a Governour [sic], because there is in England a House of Commons, a House of Lords, and a King.--They endeavour to balance these different powers, as if this equilibrium, which in England may be a necessary check to the enormous influence of royalty, could be of any use in Republics founded upon the equality of all the Citizens; and as if establishing different orders of men, was not a source of divisions and disputes.
And per circuitum [by circumlocution] it (a) may be said, I oblige my self by my owne Laws, that is by such Laws which my Governour hath made by a Power derived from my self at least as one of the Community;
She describes the use of English in Thomas Elyot's Boke named the Governour and Roger Ascham's Scholemaster that were based on the theories of humanism; the division between allegiance to home and the attraction to the remote and alien, with the example of Thomas Wilson's Arte of Rhetorique; the style of John Lyly in Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit; Edmund Spenser's efforts to invent a poetic diction in The Shepheardes Calendar; and the problem of how to set limits for poetic expression, as seen in Christopher Marlowe's Tamburlaine the Great.
(Indeed, Markham's title page declares his "A worke very profitable and necessary for the generall good of this kingdome.") In The Boke named the Governour (1531), Sir Thomas Elyot's recommendations for the rearing of the infant children of English nobles focuses attention upon their inherited constitution.
Governour John Hickenlooper warned that an extensive recovery period is ahead for the affected area.
Over all there remains the "Universal Sovereign" to whom all must answer: "Before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governour of the Universe." For this reason, Madison says, religion is "exempt from the authority of the Society at large." Much more so must it be exempt from the political authority of the government society creates.
I wish Boston may conduct matters with as much discretion as they seem to do with boldness: They seem to have great Tryals and difficulties by reason of the obduracy and ministerialism of their Governour. However Political Contests are necessary sometimes as well as military to afford exercise and practise and to instruct in the Art of defending Liberty and property.