gowk


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gowk

(ɡaʊk)
n
1. a stupid person; fool
2. (Animals) a cuckoo
[from Old Norse gaukr cuckoo; related to Old High German gouh]

gowk

(gaʊk, goʊk)

n.
a fool or simpleton.
[1275–1325; Middle English goke < Old Norse gaukr; c. Old English gēac, Old High German gouh]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the weirdest sounding Yorkshire words are: | Collop - a large slice, or dollop of food From the Swedish "kalops" | gawm - common sense From gaumr, origin of the word gormless | gowk - a cuckoo From gaukr | jannock - fair, right (justice) From jamn |minnin-on - a snack to stave off hunger until the main meal comes round From minna (to remind) |rig-welted - describes a sheep which is stuck on its back From hrygg (spine) and velte (overturn) |skeelbeease - a partition in a cowshed From skelja (to divide) | slocken - to quench one's thirst Related to modern Norwegian slokke (to quench) | |Credits: The Viking Network.
you'll say I'm a feel gowk, but I'm trying to make my placie a wee bittie as super as hers.
April Fool's Day in England, Gowk's (Cuckoo's) Day in Scotland, Poisson d'Avril (April Fish) Day in France.
| April Fool's Day, Gowk's (Cuckoo's) Day in Scotland, Poisson d'Avril (April Fish) Day in France.
April Fool's Day in England, Gowk's (Cuckoo's) Day in Scotland, Poisson d'Avril (April Fish) Day in France 1873: Sergei Rachmaninov, last of the great Russian Romantic composers, was born in Oneg.
The first day was known as "hunting the gowk," and the second day was called "Tailie Day," or "Preen-Tail Day." On the first day, pranksters would send people on pointless, long errands with meaningless messages such, "Dinna laugh, dinna smile.
and Jackson, JA.: 2002, Offset and evolution of the Gowk fault, S.E.
From tectonics point of view, this province contains the Tabas, Nayband, Kuh Banan, Gowk, Bam, Sazvaran and Minab fault systems.
In Scotland they call it "hunting the gowk" (the cuckoo), and if you are tricked, you are an "April gowk".
Certains Eecossais parlent aussi de Gowk ou de Cuckoo.
Jane Austen's remarkably erotic Pride and Prejudice and our own Scottish Jane Austen, Nancy Brysson Morrison, and her remarkable book The Gowk Storm.
It was reminiscent of the stinging review of an Oscar Wilde lecture by Ambrose Bierce, who wrote that Wilde was a "gawky gowk" who "wanders about posing as a statue of himself." The odd odyssey underscored Mitt's off-putting mix of opacity and insularity.