Gradgrind


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Grad·grind

also grad·grind  (grăd′grīnd′)
n.
One who values factual knowledge at the expense of imagination and feeling: "'No, Virginia, you've been had,' galumph uncomprehending gradgrinds who dismiss fantasy as lying" (Maureen Mullarkey).

[After Thomas Gradgrind, grimly utilitarian headmaster of a school in the novel Hard Times by Charles Dickens (1854).]
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References in classic literature ?
You might hope to get some other nonsensical belief into the head of George Gradgrind, or Augustus Gradgrind, or John Gradgrind, or Joseph Gradgrind (all supposititious, non-existent persons), but into the head of Thomas Gradgrind - no, sir!
Gradgrind always mentally introduced himself, whether to his private circle of acquaintance, or to the public in general.
Gradgrind, squarely pointing with his square forefinger, 'I don't know that girl.
Gradgrind frowned, and waved off the objectionable calling with his hand.
Gradgrind, for the general behoof of all the little pitchers.
Bitzer, after rapidly blinking at Thomas Gradgrind with both eyes at once, and so catching the light upon his quivering ends of lashes that they looked like the antennae of busy insects, put his knuckles to his freckled forehead, and sat down again.
You must paper it,' said Thomas Gradgrind, 'whether you like it or not.
You are not, Cecilia Jupe,' Thomas Gradgrind solemnly repeated,
Gradgrind, I shall be happy, at your request, to observe his mode of procedure.
This isn't a new way to treat employees - it is a throwback to the days of Gradgrind bosses and Victorian working conditions.
Gradgrind is not completely wrong; we need specialists who will be able to contribute to the work force and thus grow our economy For a democracy to thrive, though, we must invest in a humanities-infused education that will give students a well-rounded, critical education, enabling them to become better, more productive citizens, and this is where honors education can play a vital role.
Gradgrind in ''Hard Times'' ("The Good Samaritan was a Bad Economist'') seemed like a breath of fresh air.