classical mythology

(redirected from Graeco-Roman mythology)
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Noun1.classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans togetherclassical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
apple of discord - (classical mythology) a golden apple thrown into a banquet of the gods by Eris (goddess of discord--who had not been invited); the apple had `for the fairest' written on it and Hera and Athena and Aphrodite all claimed it; when Paris (prince of Troy) awarded it to Aphrodite it began a chain of events that led to the Trojan War
nectar, ambrosia - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
mythology - myths collectively; the body of stories associated with a culture or institution or person
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
amphisbaena - (classical mythology) a serpent with a head at each end of its body
basilisk - (classical mythology) a serpent (or lizard or dragon) able to kill with its breath or glance
centaur - (classical mythology) a mythical being that is half man and half horse
Erinyes, Eumenides, Fury - (classical mythology) the hideous snake-haired monsters (usually three in number) who pursued unpunished criminals
nymph - (classical mythology) a minor nature goddess usually depicted as a beautiful maiden; "the ancient Greeks believed that nymphs inhabited forests and bodies of water"
Priapus - (classical mythology) god of male procreative power and guardian of gardens and vineyards
Alcides, Heracles, Herakles, Hercules - (classical mythology) a hero noted for his strength; performed 12 immense labors to gain immortality
hero - (classical mythology) a being of great strength and courage celebrated for bold exploits; often the offspring of a mortal and a god
Golden Age - (classical mythology) the first and best age of the world, a time of ideal happiness, prosperity, and innocence; by extension, any flourishing and outstanding period
silver age - (classical mythology) the second age of the world, characterized by opulence and irreligion; by extension, a period secondary in achievement to a golden age
bronze age - (classical mythology) the third age of the world, marked by war and violence
iron age - (classical mythology) the last and worst age of the world
References in periodicals archive ?
These sculptures further mark the influence of Pharaonic and Graeco-Roman arts, where Christian symbolism was influenced by Graeco-Roman mythology, as well as older Pharaonic subjects.
Particularly singled out are this poet's revulsion at military conflict, his discarding of the baggage of Graeco-Roman mythology, his rejection of kingly absolutism, and his avoidance of the description of physical love.
A contextual understanding is particularly important when it comes to interpreting Milton's use of classical material in sensitive theological contexts, where the relationship of any seventeenth-century Christian poet to Graeco-Roman mythology was more complex than Professor Porter acknowledges.