Grande-Terre


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Grande-Terre

 (grăn′târ′, gräNd-)
An island of eastern Guadeloupe in the Leeward Islands of the West Indies.

Grande-Terre

(French ɡrɑ̃dtɛr)
n
(Placename) a French island in the Caribbean, in the Lesser Antilles: one of the two main islands which constitute Guadeloupe. Chief town: Pointe-à-Pitre

Gua•de•loupe

(ˌgwɑd lˈup)

n.
two islands (Basse-Terre and Grande-Terre) separated by a narrow channel in the Leeward Islands of the West Indies: together with five dependencies they form an overseas department of France. 334,900; 687 sq. mi. (1179 sq. km).Cap.: Basse-Terre.
References in periodicals archive ?
Located in the Lesser Antilles between Dominica and Antigua the stunning French archipelago of Guadeloupe is composed of five islands Basse-Terre, Grande-Terre, Marie-Galante, Les Saintes, and La Desirade, closely strung together by beautiful waters and an efficient ferry network.
Guadeloupe is made of two main sections - Grande-Terre in the east and Basse-Terre, where my friends and I stayed, in the west.
Mayotte, a corruption of the Arabic maute, meaning 'Place of the Dead', is an overseas collectivity of France consisting of a main island, Grande-Terre (or Mahore), a smaller island, Petite-Terre (or Pamanzi), and several islets around these two.
Comminges loves going home to the beaches and mountains around his home town of Les Abymes, located on the west side of the Grande-Terre Island.
It was a settling of accounts between opposing factions that harkened back to the anti-German resistance: an abandoned arms cache right beside the grande-terre, which perhaps Sir Jack was investigating.