Gravettian


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Gravettian

(ɡrəˈvɛtɪən)
adj
(Archaeology) of, referring to, or characteristic of an Upper Palaeolithic culture, characterized esp by small pointed blades with blunt backs
[C20: from La Gravette on the Dordogne, France]

Gravettian

Belonging to a Paleolithic culture in southwestern France in which people made small, pointed stone blades with blunt backs.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This had never disappeared during the Gravettian and Solutrean, having surviving as a secondary weapon technology in parallel with the much more common single-element stone points in those intervening periods of the middle Upper Paleolithic.
Paleolithic dog skulls at the Gravettian Predmosti site, the Czech Republic.
(2002): The Gravettian occipital bone from the site of Malladetes (Barx, Valencia, Spain).
Trinkaus, Eds., Portrait of the Artist as a Child: The Gravettian Human Skeletonfrom theAbrigo do Lagar Velho and Its Archeological Context, Trabalhos de Arqueologia 22, Instituto Portugues de Arqueologia, Lisboa, Portugal, 2002.
The art of ceramics for purposes other than storage can be traced as far as the ancient goddess figurines, dated back to the Gravettian Period (29,000-25,000 B.C.).
They focus on the Early Upper Palaeolithic, encompass a wide region within Central Eastern Europe, and concentrate on the early phases of the Aurignacian and the transition to the Gravettian. Among the topics are whether the Early Aurignacian in Central Europe represents the initial dispersion of anatomically modern humans in Europe, archaeological and palaeoecological studies of palaeolithic industries before the Last Glacial Maximum between 32,000 and 20,000 ago, whether fishing was an important subsistence activity in the Upper Palaeolithic of Southwest Germany, imprints discovered on palaeolithic ceramics at sites in Lower Austria, and different excavation techniques and their stratigraphic results.
The artefacts made by humans at the site allowed archaeologists to tie the ancient people to a cultural tradition known as the Gravettian.
The I-haplogroup is thought to have been introduced into Europe by the Gravettian culture, which migrated from the Middle East about 25,000 years ago.
From the early Eocene primates and Miocene apes to the later pioneers of Gravettian and, finally, farming cultures that ultimately took Europe and Asia by storm, Finlayson explores the related fates of several hominid forms.
There have never been female figures among sculptures found in this region and this figure, with exaggerated female characteristics, predates the famous Gravettian Venuses by more than 5,000 years.