acceleration of free fall

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Related to Gravitational acceleration: gravitational force, gravitational potential energy

acceleration of free fall

n
(Atomic Physics) the acceleration of a body falling freely in a vacuum near the surface of the earth in the earth's gravitational field: the standard value is 9.806 65 metres per second per second or 32.174 feet per second per second. Symbol: g Also called: acceleration due to gravity or acceleration of gravity
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of the project is to develop a methodology for determining vertical gradients of gravity acceleration (especially for the purpose of transferring the gravitational acceleration value from the absolute gravimeter reference point to the point of gravity stabilization).
The data depicts the 10 per cent 'exceedance probability" that a peak ground acceleration of a certain fraction of the gravitational acceleration is observed within the next 50 years.
Gravimetric measurements conducted in the area of Czorsztyn and Niedzica indicated quasi-periodic changes in the gravitational acceleration, amounting to approximately 20 [micro]Gal.
2]) and in terms of gravitational acceleration (g).
Though studies on the gravitational acceleration have suggested a maximum of 4.
Weight is the product of mass and of gravitational acceleration (g).
However, the sensor would need to withstand gravitational acceleration up to 2,500 g, be very light so as to prevent tire imbalance and last the full life of the tire, a minimum of eight years.
Their model is capable of pinpointing extreme differences in gravitational acceleration than was earlier observed.
Next, we shall introduce the vector of gravitational acceleration strength G and the vector of torsion field strength [OMEGA] (gravitomagnetic field) according to the formulas:
Seismic hazards in terms of percent gravitational acceleration,
Primary sensors in inertial navigation are sensors of angular velocity, whose output signals after integration are used for determining the orientation in space, and accelerometers whose output signals after precise compensation of gravitational acceleration and the Coriolis force can be integrated onto the speed and position.