gravitational lens

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gravitational lens
Abell 2218, a cluster of galaxies in the constellation Draco

gravitational lens

n.
A massive object, such as a star or galaxy, whose gravitational field bends light rays.

gravitational lens

n
(Astronomy) astronomy a lenslike effect in which light rays are bent when passing through the gravitational field of such massive objects as galaxies or black holes

gravita′tional lens′



n.
Astron. a celestial body, as a galaxy, whose gravitational field refracts the light of a more distant object.
[1945–50]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The wobbling of the BCGs could only be analysed as the galaxy clusters studied also act as gravitational lenses.
com/nasas-hubble-spots-universes-brightest-galaxies-thanks-gravitational-lensing-2548686) gravitational lenses , which bend light that passes through them, allowing scientists to create a map of dark matter within them.
We have hit the jackpot of gravitational lenses," said lead researcher James Lowenthal of Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts.
Gravitational lenses can help magnify or brighten images of faraway objects, extending scientists' vision.
Astronomers from the CLASH team and the Supernova Cosmology Project are using these supernovae in a new method for measuring the magnification, or prescription, of the gravitational lenses.
When light from a very distant object passes a galaxy closer to us, its path can be bent so the image of the distant galaxy is magnified and distorted, called gravitational lenses.
Observations of gravitational lenses, she explained, could provide the evidence which was required.
It has been known for some time that around 90pc of the mass of the universe is missing because it cannot be seen by telescopes, but its existence is confirmed by the counting of very rare gravitational lenses - galaxies which bend the paths of light or radio waves.
Scientists will be getting the best glimpses yet of faraway galaxies, gravitational lenses, space dust, dark matter and the formation of stars.
Detailed images taken from observatories, satellites, and NASA space probes include planets, moons, comets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, Supernova 1987A, quasars, gravitational lenses, and black hole candidates.
That's the focus of the Frontier Fields project, which has already peered through three other gravitational lenses in other galaxy clusters, with two more on the agenda.
Strong gravitational lenses built by massive clusters are powerful tools.