gravitation

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Related to Gravitational physics: Gravitational pull, Force of gravity

grav·i·ta·tion

 (grăv′ĭ-tā′shən)
n.
1. Physics
a. The natural phenomenon of attraction between physical objects with mass or energy; the weakest of the four fundamental forces of nature. Also called gravity.
b. The act or process of moving under the influence of this attraction.
2. A movement toward a source of attraction: the gravitation of the middle classes to the suburbs.

grav′i·ta′tion·al adj.
grav′i·ta′tion·al·ly adv.
grav′i·ta′tive adj.

gravitation

(ˌɡrævɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) the force of attraction that bodies exert on one another as a result of their mass
2. (General Physics) any process or result caused by this interaction, such as the fall of a body to the surface of the earth
Also called: gravity

grav•i•ta•tion

(ˌgræv ɪˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1.
a. the force of attraction between any two masses.
b. an act or process caused by this force.
2. a sinking or falling.
3. a movement or tendency toward something or someone.
[1635–45; < New Latin]
grav`i•ta′tion•al, adj.
grav`i•ta′tion•al•ly, adv.

grav·i·ta·tion

(grăv′ĭ-tā′shən)
The force of attraction that tends to draw together any two objects in the universe. Gravitation increases as the mass of the objects increases and as their distance from each other decreases.

gravitation

The mutual attraction between bodies, due to their masses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravitation - (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universegravitation - (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface; "the more remote the body the less the gravity"; "the gravitation between two bodies is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them"; "gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love"--Albert Einstein
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
attraction, attractive force - the force by which one object attracts another
solar gravity - the gravity of the sun; "solar gravity creates extreme pressures and temperatures"
2.gravitation - movement downward resulting from gravitational attraction; "irrigation by gravitation rather than by pumps"
change of location, travel - a movement through space that changes the location of something
drop, fall - a free and rapid descent by the force of gravity; "it was a miracle that he survived the drop from that height"
levitation - movement upward in virtue of lightness
3.gravitation - a figurative movement toward some attraction; "the gravitation of the middle class to the suburbs"
trend, drift, movement - a general tendency to change (as of opinion); "not openly liberal but that is the trend of the book"; "a broad movement of the electorate to the right"
Translations
gravitacepřitažlivost
gravitaatiopainovoima
gravitacija
引力
gravitaţie
gravitationtyngdkraft

gravitation

[ˌgrævɪˈteɪʃən] N (Phys) → gravitación f (fig) → tendencia f (towards a)

gravitation

[ˌgrævɪˈteɪʃən] n (PHYSICS)gravitation f

gravitation

n (Phys) → Gravitation f, → Schwerkraft f; (fig)Hinneigung f(to zu); the hippies’ gravitation to San Franciscodie Anziehungskraft, die San Francisco auf die Hippies ausübt

gravitation

[ˌgrævɪˈteɪʃn] ngravitazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
This extreme environment -- the strongest gravitational field in our galaxy -- makes it the perfect place to test gravitational physics, particularly Einstein's general theory of relativity.
An international team of researchers from the German Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute, AEI) in Hannover, the Leibniz Universitat Hannover, and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory switched on their instrument and achieved success on first try.
The humongous void, popularly known as Sagittarius A*, has an incredibly strong gravitational field, which made the conditions in its proximity ideal to test different theories of gravitational physics.
"For the past decade, the Gravitational Physics Group at Cardiff University has laid the foundations for how we go about detecting gravitational waves and have developed novel algorithms and software that have now become standard search tools for detecting the elusive signals."
We asked Patrick Sutton, head of Cardiff University's gravitational physics department, who contributed to the discovery.
His research has been predominantly focused on general relativity and gravitational physics.
It was very clear and there was no room for doubt that it was direct evidence of the waves, said Bruce Allen, who is acting director at Germany's Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics.
Astronomers and physicists discuss selected topics in relativistic celestial mechanics, a branch of modern gravitational physics that explores the fundamental structures of space-time by studying the motion of massive bodies such as black holes, stars, planets, as well as elementary particles.
Karsten Danzmann, director at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics and head of the Institute for Gravitational Physics at the Leibniz Universitat Hannover, said that getting LISA Pathfinder's core measurement technologies ready to go operational means that we have just completed another crucial step.
Theory and Experiment in Gravitational Physics, Cambridge Univ.