gravity wave

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gravity wave

n.
1. A wave induced in a fluid, especially the ocean or atmosphere, by the interaction of gravity with other forces on the motion of the fluid.
2. A gravitational wave. Not in technical use.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gravity wave

n
1. (General Physics) a wave propagated in a gravitational field, predicted to occur as a result of an accelerating mass
2. (General Physics) a surface wave on water or other liquid propagated because of the weight of liquid in the crests
Also called: gravitational wave
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravity wave - (physics) a wave that is hypothesized to propagate gravity and to travel at the speed of light
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preliminary analysis of the radiosonde data provided inconclusive evidence of eclipse-driven gravity waves but showed that the short duration of darkness during totality was enough to alter boundary layer (BL) height, the lowest layer of the atmosphere, substantially.
Modelling the interior of stars, the team predicted that gravity waves, like those we see in the ocean, could break at the surface of stars.
Why is it so difficult to detect gravity waves? What can we learn about the universe thanks to them?
This edition has revised and updated chapters with new text and images on observatories, scientific missions, and new discoveries; reorganized and updated sections, such as those on young stellar objects and protostellar disks and supernovae explosions; revisions to sections on modern optical telescopes, gravity wave astronomy, and the composition of the sun; an added essay on what can be learned from a mistake in claims about discovering gravity waves; examples demonstrating the use of key equations; new sense-of-proportion questions; removal of boxed features on fundamentals; revised end-of-chapter summaries; replacement of discussion questions with active inquiry questions; and updated cases.
While the direct observation of a neutron-star merger in both light and gravity waves was indeed a historic event, it's not the first time we've "usher[ed] in an entirely new era of 'multi-messenger astronomy.'" Wouldn't this new era be more accurately dated to the detection of neutrinos and optical radiation from Supernova 1987A?
NASA SPoRT also released infrared footage of the gravity waves spilling out from the deep convection currents in the storm.
Gravity waves are so small that it takes a special detector like the twin-assembly of Laser Interferometer Gravitional-Wave Observatory (LIGO) to find one.
Below 1 Hz, the dominant source of this wave field is oceanic gravity waves (specifically, ocean swell, wind waves, and ocean infragravity waves).
Mountain wave turbulence is caused by gravity waves and interaction with strong winds across terrain.
System (2) can describe the dynamic behavior of finite amplitude acoustic gravity waves in a rotating atmosphere.
Gravity waves (GWs) are generated by convection, topography, instability, tropical cyclones, and various adjustment processes in the atmosphere [49, 50].
Bhattacharjee and Sahoo (2007) [9] used dispersion relation to analyze detailed characteristics of the flexural gravity waves due to a floating elastic plate in the presence of a following current or an opposing current.