gray area

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gray area

n.
An area of uncertainty or indeterminacy: "people ... whose problems lie in that vast gray area between the physical and mental" (Carla Cantor).
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Noun1.gray area - an intermediate area; a topic that is not clearly one thing or the other
area - a subject of study; "it was his area of specialization"; "areas of interest include..."
References in periodicals archive ?
Measurement of the proportion of free-to-to-tal prostate-specific antigen improves diagnostic perfor-mance of prostate-specific antigen in the diagnostic gray zone of total prostate-specific antigen.
In focusing on such a situation, The Counterfeiters joins a small group of Holocaust films made over the last decades in which characters are faced with what Lawrence Langer has called "choiceless choices," "where moral choice as we know it was superfluous, and inmates were left with the futile task of redefining decency in an atmosphere that could not support it." (4) Such films highlight the futility of seeking moral lessons in the no-win situations of what Primo Levi termed the "gray zone." (5) In The Counterfeiters, however, moral lessons lose importance in favor of a suspenseful plot thread in the film which is more typical of a conventional thriller.
Otar assigns all of his mature clients to one of three color-coded zones--the Green Zone, Gray Zone or Red Zone.
Simsek said there used to be restrictions in Luxembourg until recently, noting that in compliance with the decisions taken in the G-20 meetings in Pittsburgh, Luxembourg agreed to exchange financial information on records, carrying the country out of the gray zone.
Routine Politics and Violence in Argentina: The Gray Zone of State Power
of Dusseldorf, Germany), is a branch of nanoscience that deals with the electronic transport properties of solid state nanostructures; as the name implies, phenomenon related to it must be sought in the gray zone between microscopic and macroscopic realms.
For a given clinical context, this approach allows a 3-zone partition of test results including the gray zone. It requires only the knowledge of the distributions of test values in diseased and nondiseased individuals and the specification of (a) a reasonable value (or range of values) of pretest probability of the suspected disease (diagnostic hypothesis) in the clinical setting or practice where the application of the test is considered, and (b) values of "working diagnosis" posttest probabilities for confirming ("ruling in") and excluding ("ruling out") the diagnostic hypothesis in this practice.
They aren't functioning in a "gray zone," they are flat-out endorsing or opposing candidates.
"There is a gray zone where you are not hypertensive but your blood pressure is not normal."
Consider a borderline cardiovascular risk profile in that gray zone between Preferred and Standard.
Steele's article recalls specious arguments that we faced years ago regarding nations such as Poland and the Baltic states: that we should consign these countries to a gray zone or a "sphere of influence," where their fate rests in the hands of outside powers.
Themes of good and evil and the gray zone in between, of betrayal, of forgiveness, of love, of tolerance, abound.