Great Seal of the United States


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Noun1.Great Seal of the United States - the seal of the United States government
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Continental Congress put on the Great Seal of the United States that they adopted in 1782 the inscription Annuit Coeptis, meaning he (God) has favored our undertakings.
John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson even used a foreign phrase "E Pluribus Unum" (Latin for "out of many, one") for the first Great Seal of the United States.
It also bears the Welsh leek, Harry's label and olive branches adopted from the Great Seal of the United States.
The Eye is a symbol of an all-seeing God watching over humanity and is well-known for being on the American dollar, on the reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States. With its association to the United States, the most powerful government in the world, one can't help but be a little on edge and think of the government as Big Brother.
Like the Office of Presidential Appointments, which affixes to documents the Great Seal of the United States (State Magazine, April 2014), the Office of Authentications affixes a seal--that of the State Department--on a range of Authentication and Apostille certificates that are signed by the Secretary of State.
The 1782 Great Seal of the United States, however, includes several Latin phrases, among them E Pluribus Unum ("Out of Many, One") and Novus Ordo Seclorum ("A New Order of the Ages").
It is attractively published and comes with a handsome blue and white dust jacket depicting the Great Seal of the United States that appears on the back side of our one dollar bill.
The jacket has brass buttons with the obverse side of Great Seal of the United States located on the four pockets and the front.
Their meaning was first stated in 1782 in a report to Congress by the committee charged with designing the Great Seal of the United States. Charles Thomson, secretary of the Continental Congress, stated that the seal's escutcheon has the same colors and meaning as those of the flag.
The Great Seal of the United States, featuring an eagle and shield, is printed in purple to the right of the portrait of President Lincoln.
Buchanan once stated in an editorial commentary, "The melting pot--language, law and culture--worked to make us one nation and one people." On the Great Seal of the United States, there is emblazoned the motto: "E Pluribus Unum." According to Alan Frederick at Oxford University, "E Pluribus Unum" is Latin for "one out of many," or, "from many, one." Never codified by law, it was considered a de facto motto of the United States until 1956, when Congress passed a resolution adopting "In God We Trust" as the official motto.