Great Society


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Great Society

n.
1. The set of programs and policies designed to combat poverty and promote social reform introduced during the 1960s by President Lyndon B. Johnson.
2. The period during which these programs and policies were developed.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
If it is strange for me to look back from a distance both in time and space on these bygone adventures of our youth, it must be stranger for you who tread the same streets--who may to-morrow open the door of the old Speculative, where we begin to rank with Scott and Robert Emmet and the beloved and inglorious Macbean--or may pass the corner of the close where that great society, the L.
At this rate you will soon reform everybody at Mansfield and Thornton Lacey; and when I hear of you next, it may be as a celebrated preacher in some great society of Methodists, or as a missionary into foreign parts.' She tried to speak carelessly, but she was not so careless as she wanted to appear.
So in this great society wide lying around us, a critical analysis would find very few spontaneous actions.
of California at Berkeley) and Livermore (social work, Louisiana State U.) have collected reviews, documentation and expert analysis on the impact of social policy on economic and political considerations, and they also provide a history of social policy during colonial times, the Civil War, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression and the Great Society. Current social services such as child and family welfare, income maintenance and support, social security, housing policies and accommodations for people with disabilities are also analyzed.
Too many of us made that mistake in the '50s and '60s, and some may be making it today--even Rick Perlstein, who concludes the prologue to Before the Storm by stating that the nation now has entered a conservative epoch as "surely as the time between the New Deal and the Great Society was a liberal one" Which raises the question of whether some new Clif White, or some before-his-time Goldwater, may be readying himself to challenge a new consensus.
The New Deal solved the problem of the Depression, goes this line of thought, and the Great Society solved the problem of poverty.
The helping hand of government envisioned by liberal politicians in the New Deal and the Great Society is not only withdrawing, it's giving the poor a slap in the face.
Thornton looks at how the rhetoric changed according to whether Johnson was serving as Senator, Vice President, or President and also the ways that Johnson chose to package his Great Society vision of education depending on the audience.
Led by Donald Devine, OPM seemed to strangle recruitment efforts, terminating, for example, all promotional material for VISTA, the Great Society program that sent young people into poor areas to teach and work.
Looking at Great Society welfare programs, he maintains that the solution to poverty is simply to give money to poor people, without necessarily expecting them to do work.
Suspicions linger of the former Texas Democrat who could backslide - "Debbie Does the Great Society?" The lack of enthusiasm for Gramm indicates he could have been right - he may be too ugly to be President.
Little new ideological ground is paved, but what is most notable in the proceedings is Coates' willingness to robustly defend the ideas of New Deal and Great Society liberalism, a proclivity often lacking in Democratic supporters of the Clinton era and today.
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