Great Vowel Shift


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Great Vowel Shift

n.
A series of phonetic changes occurring in Early Modern English in which the Middle English low and mid long vowels were raised, (ä) and (ō) becoming (ā) and (o͞o), for example, while the high long vowels (ē) and (o͞o) became the diphthongs (ī) and (ou).

Great Vowel Shift

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) linguistics a phonetic change that took place during the transition from Middle to Modern English, whereby the long vowels were raised (eː became iː, oː became uː, etc). The vowels (iː) and (uː) underwent breaking and became the diphthongs (aɪ) and (aʊ)

Great′ Vow′el Shift′


n.
a series of changes in the quality of the long vowels between Middle and Modern English as a result of which all were raised, while the high vowels (ē) and (o̅o̅), already at the upper limit, underwent breaking to become the diphthongs (ī) and (ou).
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There are detailed descriptions of each historical period of English, with specific areas in each time period, such as the Great Vowel Shift, chosen for detailed study.
Quiz of the Day ANSWERS: 1 Australia - the Great Barrier Reef; 2 Rouen; 3 Mycroft; 4 X and y; 5 He ran in bare feet; 6 British Airways and Air France; 7 Tamla Records (Motown); 8 The Great Vowel Shift; 9 In the eye; 10 Maureen Connolly.
The resulting monophthongs became the input to the diphthongisation rule, a part of the Great Vowel Shift. On the basis of forty-nine Middle English poetic texts from the Chadwyck-Healey online corpus un effort is made here to establish temporal and dialectal conditioning of the change.
His biggest strength is his systematic, sequential approach, reminiscent of a skilled detective following clues to reach a solution, which one can see best in the treatment of Open Syllable Lengthening (OSL), the developments of the front vowels (notably Vowels 3, 4, and 8) within the Great Vowel Shift (GVS) complex and the Scottish Vowel Length rule (SVLR), covering developments vowel by vowel, environment by environment, resolutely and doggedly.
In academic circles, this progression is frequently called "the great vowel shift."
It is not, however, an academic text, so it is inevitable that some subjects, such as the Great Vowel Shift - a fifteenth century phenomenon in which long vowels came to be pronounced with greater elevation of the tongue so they sound more like we would pronounce today -are skimmed over when they are critical to understanding the development of English.
Inicialmente, Fennell no tiene en cuenta esta distincion, no plantea su origen distintivo en ingles antiguo --el cual se ofrece como /e:/ y /E/ para una unica vocal cerrada /e:/ en ingles medio--, ni su importancia para el desarrollo posterior del Great Vowel Shift, cuando ME /e:/ > EModE /i:/, y ME /E:/ > EModE /e:/ > /i:/ o /ee/ (98-99).
In between Chaucer and Shakespeare came that perplexing phenomenon, The Great Vowel Shift. These are the kinds of cliches which students already retail tirelessly in their essays.
Through the workings of the Great Vowel Shift, original Middle Scots (and Middle English) /[epsilon]: generally rose to Modern Scots (and Modern English) /i(:)/.
He ends with the Great Vowel Shift, a change that created our modern pronunciation and destroyed phonetic spelling.
This term was introduced by Wells (1982: 256) to refer to the most recent ongoing developments associated with the Great Vowel Shift in which these diphthongs/i:, u:, ei, ou, ai, au/show continuing movement of their first elements, beyond those reached by RP, so:
The dating of the Great Vowel Shift seems inexplicably early, the account of medieval French stress is probably oversimplified, and the use of the term 'perfective' is incorrect.