Greats


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great

 (grāt)
adj. great·er, great·est
1.
a. Very large in size, extent, or intensity: a great pile of rubble; a great storm.
b. Of a larger size than other, similar forms: the great anteater.
c. Large in quantity or number: A great throng awaited us. See Synonyms at large.
d. Extensive in time or distance: a great delay; a great way off.
2.
a. Remarkable or outstanding in magnitude, degree, or extent: a great crisis; great anticipation.
b. Of outstanding significance or importance: a great work of art.
c. Chief or principal: the great house on the estate.
d. Superior in quality or character; noble: a great man who dedicated himself to helping others.
e. Powerful; influential: one of the great nations of the West.
f. Eminent; distinguished: a great leader.
3. Informal
a. Very good; first-rate: We had a great time at the dance.
b. Very skillful: She is great at algebra.
c. Enthusiastic: a great lover of music.
4. Being one generation removed from the relative specified. Often used in combination: a great-granddaughter.
5. Archaic Pregnant.
n.
1. pl. greats or great One that is great: a composer considered among the greats.
2. Music
a. A division of most pipe organs, usually containing the most powerful ranks of pipes.
b. A similar division of other organs.
adv. Informal
1. Very well: got along great with the teacher.
2. Used as an intensive with certain adjectives: a great big kiss.

[Middle English grete, from Old English grēat, thick, coarse.]

great′ly adv.
great′ness n.

Greats

(ɡreɪts)
(at Oxford University) pl n
1. (Education) the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, involving the study of Greek and Roman history and literature and philosophy
2. (Education) the final examinations at the end of this course
References in classic literature ?
The stars, those dial points of heaven, now warned the adventurers to close their eyes on the blazing logs, and open them, in dreams, to the glow of the Great Carbuncle.
And behold, thereby came he unawares also to the gate of the GREAT CITY.
In the center of the roof was a great light, as bright as the sun, which made the emeralds sparkle in a wonderful manner.
But Aristotle was out of all patience with the account I gave him of Scotus and Ramus, as I presented them to him; and he asked them, "whether the rest of the tribe were as great dunces as themselves?"
Cautiously the weird party crept through the jungle in the wake of the great ape until at last he halted them with a raised hand and pointed upward and a little ahead.
But there are a great many unreasonable ones, as I suppose you know--not yours, dear mother, for I am bound to say that you never required of me more than was natural.
He, however, no doubt would forgive thee, for he was the most humble-minded and courteous knight of his time, and moreover a great protector of damsels; but some there are that might have heard thee, and it would not have been well for thee in that case; for they are not all courteous or mannerly; some are ill-conditioned scoundrels; nor is it everyone that calls himself a gentleman, that is so in all respects; some are gold, others pinchbeck, and all look like gentlemen, but not all can stand the touchstone of truth.
When we approached these points a warrior would be sent far ahead with a powerful field glass, and if no great body of red Martian troops was in sight we would advance as close as possible without chance of being seen and then camp until dark, when we would slowly approach the cultivated tract, and, locating one of the numerous, broad highways which cross these areas at regular intervals, creep silently and stealthily across to the arid lands upon the other side.
It was this ardour which made him great. He was a flaming example to the wooers of glorious fortune.
One afternoon, when the sun was going down, a mother and her little boy sat at the door of their cottage, talking about the Great Stone Face.
Desired at a feast to touch a lute, he said, He could not fiddle, but yet he could make a small town, a great city.
1-25) From the Heliconian Muses let us begin to sing, who hold the great and holy mount of Helicon, and dance on soft feet about the deep-blue spring and the altar of the almighty son of Cronos, and, when they have washed their tender bodies in Permessus or in the Horse's Spring or Olmeius, make their fair, lovely dances upon highest Helicon and move with vigorous feet.