Doric order

(redirected from Greek Doric)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Greek Doric: Doric columns
click for a larger image
Doric order
Doric order capital

Doric order

n.
1. The oldest and simplest of the three main orders of classical Greek architecture, characterized by heavy fluted columns with plain, saucer-shaped capitals and no base.
2. A Roman order of similar design but with the addition of a base.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Doric order - the oldest and simplest of the Greek orders and the only one that normally has no baseDoric order - the oldest and simplest of the Greek orders and the only one that normally has no base
order - (architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the type of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans
References in periodicals archive ?
Giuseppe Mazzini, for instance, was buried in a rock-cut tomb in a hillside in Staglieno, behind severe Greek Doric columns.
This is when a grand new dining room and the striking Greek Doric colonnade in front of the central service wing were added.
The emphasis on simplicity extended to architecture--architects such as Robert Adam spoke of geometric purity and favored the rather stern Greek Doric order.
It has a fine Greek Doric Temple front, detailed in fine ashlar stone.
Sir Charles had been inspired by ancient Greece and the buildings he had seen on his honeymoon in Athens and, to a design by architect John Dobson, had Belsay Hall built in the Greek Doric style.
Like the: house for Sir John Soane (1753-1837, the building was open to the public, and played no small part in popularising Neo-Classicism (the picture-gallery was one of the earliest English interiors to be articulated with the Greek Doric Order).
Above the Greek doric columns, veranda and main house, Alcedo's sash windows look across the river to therolling countryside beyond.
Her thesis that Loos was not outrightly hostile towards ornament is linked to the contradictions of a dialectic of modernity and antiquity, which is evident in both his 'House' on the Michaelerplatz (interpreted here as a 'gateway', a 'liminal space' between modern commercial flux and imperial permanence) and his design for the Chicago Tribune skyscraper in the form of a Greek Doric column.