Greek Revival

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Greek Revival

n.
An architectural style imitating elements of ancient Greek temple design, popular in the United States and Europe in the first half of the 1800s.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Greek Revival

n
(Architecture) (modifier) denoting, relating to, or having the style of architecture used in Western Europe in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, based upon ancient Greek classical examples
Greek Revivalism n
Greek Revivalist adj, n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Greek′ Reviv′al


n.
a style of architecture, furnishings, and decoration prevalent in the first half of the 19th century, characterized by imitation of ancient Greek designs and ornamented motifs.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Led by Joseph Francois Mangin, who also designed New York City Hall, the building is one of New York's most revered federal style three-story structures, built in the Greek Revival architecture.
It is an awe-inspiring display of French, Gothic and Greek revival architecture.
Designed by Chester- based architect Thomas Harrison, the listed Grade I entrance to Chester Castle is considered to be one of the best examples of Greek Revival Architecture in the country.
"The Lakeport Plantation house is Arkansas' grandest remaining example of antebellum Greek Revival architecture," says the blog, written by Lee Price, director of development at the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts in Philadelphia.
The building is given legal protection from alteration and destruction because of its 19th-century, Greek revival architecture.