stoicism

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Related to Greek skeptics: Pyrrhonian skepticism

sto·i·cism

 (stō′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. Indifference to pleasure or pain; impassiveness.
2. Stoicism The doctrines or philosophy of the Stoics.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stoicism

(ˈstəʊɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. indifference to pleasure and pain
2. (Philosophy) (capital) the philosophy of the Stoics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sto•i•cism

(ˈstoʊ əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the philosophy of the Stoics.
2. (l.c.) conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, as repression of emotion and indifference to pleasure or pain.
[1620–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

stoicism

a form of conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, especially as characterized by indifference to pain and pleasure. — stoic, n., adj.stoical, adj.
See also: Pleasure
an indifference to pleasure or pain. — stoic, n., adj. — stoical, adj.
See also: Pain
the school of philosophy founded by Zeno (of Citium), who asserted that men should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity. — Stoic, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

stoicism

A Greek philosophy adopted by Rome stressing private rectitude and involvement in public affairs.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stoicism - an indifference to pleasure or pain
emotionlessness, unemotionality - absence of emotion
2.Stoicism - (philosophy) the philosophical system of the Stoics following the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

stoicism

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪzəm] Nestoicismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪzəm] nstoïcisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Stoicism

n (Philos) → Stoizismus m

stoicism

n (fig)Stoizismus m, → stoische Ruhe, Gleichmut m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪz] nstoicismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
New York University professor Mitchell Stephens sidesteps this pitfall by using his journalism background: his book is a lively history of major philosophers, non-believers and controversyseekers from Ancient Greek Skeptics to modern ambivalence, including the John Lennon lyric of the title.
New York University professor Mitchell Stephens uses his journalism background to provide a lively history of major philosophers, non-believers and controversy-seekers from Ancient Greek Skeptics to modern ambivalence, including the lyric used for its title.
According to Plato and Platonism, the most important and the most influential of ancient Greek skeptics was Plato himself.