tragedy

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trag·e·dy

(trăj′ĭ-dē)
n. pl. trag·e·dies
1.
a. A drama or literary work in which the main character is brought to ruin or suffers extreme sorrow, especially as a consequence of a tragic flaw, moral weakness, or inability to cope with unfavorable circumstances.
b. The genre made up of such works.
c. The art or theory of writing or producing these works.
2. A play, film, television program, or other narrative work that portrays or depicts calamitous events and has an unhappy but meaningful ending.
3. A disastrous event, especially one involving distressing loss or injury to life: an expedition that ended in tragedy, with all hands lost at sea.
4. A tragic aspect or element.

[Middle English tragedie, from Old French, from Latin tragoedia, from Greek tragōidiā : tragos, goat; see tragic + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots and (Greek tragedy probably being so called because it developed from a ritual or festival procession involving a goat as the sacrifice or the prize for the composition of a song, or perhaps because festival participants wore animal masks and skins, including those of goats).]

tragedy

(ˈtrædʒɪdɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Theatre) (esp in classical and Renaissance drama) a play in which the protagonist, usually a man of importance and outstanding personal qualities, falls to disaster through the combination of a personal failing and circumstances with which he cannot deal
2. (Theatre) (in later drama, such as that of Ibsen) a play in which the protagonist is overcome by a combination of social and psychological circumstances
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any dramatic or literary composition dealing with serious or sombre themes and ending with disaster
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in medieval literature) a literary work in which a great person falls from prosperity to disaster, often through no fault of his own
5. (Theatre) the branch of drama dealing with such themes
6. the unfortunate aspect of something
7. a shocking or sad event; disaster
[C14: from Old French tragédie, from Latin tragoedia, from Greek tragōidia, from tragos goat + ōidē song; perhaps a reference to the goat-satyrs of Peloponnesian plays]

trag•e•dy

(ˈtrædʒ ɪ di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. a lamentable, dreadful, or fatal event or affair; calamity; disaster: a family tragedy.
2. the tragic element of drama, of literature generally, or of life: the tragedy of poverty.
3. a literary composition, as a novel, dealing with a somber theme carried to a tragic conclusion.
4. a dramatic composition, often in verse, dealing with a serious or somber theme, typically that of a great person destined through a flaw of character or conflict with some overpowering force, as fate or society, to suffer downfall or destruction.
5. the branch of the drama that is concerned with this form of composition.
6. the art and theory of writing and producing tragedies.
[1325–75; Middle English tragedie < Medieval Latin tragēdia, Latin tragoedia < Greek tragōidía=trág(os) goat + ōidḗ song (see ode) + -ia -y3]

tragedy

A serious drama where the protagonist is overcome by social or psychological circumstances or personal failure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tragedy - an event resulting in great loss and misfortunetragedy - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
misfortune, bad luck - unnecessary and unforeseen trouble resulting from an unfortunate event
act of God, force majeure, inevitable accident, unavoidable casualty, vis major - a natural and unavoidable catastrophe that interrupts the expected course of events; "he discovered that his house was not insured against acts of God"
apocalypse - a cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of evil
famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
kiss of death - something that is ruinous; "if this were known it would be the kiss of death for my political career"
meltdown - a disaster comparable to a nuclear meltdown; "there is little likelihood of a meltdown comparable to the American banking collapse in March 1933"
plague - any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
visitation - any disaster or catastrophe; "a visitation of the plague"
tidal wave - an unusual (and often destructive) rise of water along the seashore caused by a storm or a combination of wind and high tide
tsunami - a cataclysm resulting from a destructive sea wave caused by an earthquake or volcanic eruption; "a colossal tsunami destroyed the Minoan civilization in minutes"
2.tragedy - drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or circumstancetragedy - drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or circumstance; excites terror or pity
drama - the literary genre of works intended for the theater
tragicomedy - a dramatic composition involving elements of both tragedy and comedy usually with the tragic predominating
comedy - light and humorous drama with a happy ending

tragedy

noun
1. disaster, catastrophe, misfortune, adversity, calamity, affliction, whammy (informal, chiefly U.S.), bummer (slang), grievous blow They have suffered an enormous personal tragedy.
disaster success, fortune, joy, happiness, prosperity
2. tragic drama, play a classic Greek tragedy
Quotations
"Tragedy is clean, it is restful, it is flawless" [Jean Anouilh Antigone]
"Tragedy ought to be a great kick at misery" [D.H. Lawrence letter]
"All tragedies are finish'd by a death,"
"All comedies are ended by a marriage" [Lord Byron Don Juan]
"The world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel" [Horace Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford Letters]

tragedy

noun
An occurrence inflicting widespread destruction and distress:
Translations
حادِث مأساوي، مأساهمَأْساةمأساة، رِوايَةٌ مأساوِيَّه
tragédie
tragedie
tragediamurhenäytelmä
tragedija
tragédiadrámaszomorújáték
harmleikursorgaratburîur
悲惨な出来事
비극
tragedijatragiškas
traģēdija
tragédia
tragedija
tragedi
โศกนาฏกรรม
trajediağlatıfacia
tấn thảm kịch

tragedy

[ˈtrædʒɪdɪ] N (gen) (Theat) → tragedia f
it is a tragedy thates una tragedia que ...
the tragedy of it is thatlo trágico del asunto es que ...
a personal tragedyuna tragedia personal

tragedy

[ˈtrædʒədi] n
(= tragic event) → tragédie f
(= play) → tragédie f

tragedy

n (= tragic incident)Tragödie f; (Theat also) → Trauerspiel nt; (no pl: = tragicness) → Tragische(s) nt; he often acts in tragedyer tritt oft in Tragödien auf; six killed in bus crash tragedytragischer Busunfall forderte sechs Todesopfer; the tragedy of it is that …das Tragische daran ist, dass …; it is a tragedy that …es ist (wirklich) tragisch or ein Unglück, dass …

tragedy

[ˈtrædʒɪdɪ] n (gen) (Theatre) → tragedia
it is a tragedy that ... → è una vera disgrazia che...

tragedy

(ˈtrӕdʒədi) plural ˈtragedies noun
1. (a) drama about unfortunate events with a sad outcome. `Hamlet' is one of Shakespeare's tragedies.
2. an unfortunate or sad event. His early death was a great tragedy for his family.
ˈtragic adjective
1. sad; unfortunate. I heard of the tragic death of her son.
2. of tragedy or tragedies. a tragic hero.

tragedy

مَأْساة tragédie tragedie Tragödie τραγωδία tragedia tragedia tragédie tragedija tragedia 悲惨な出来事 비극 tragedie tragedie tragedia tragédia трагедия tragedi โศกนาฏกรรม trajedi tấn thảm kịch 悲剧
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Her key observation is that the Greek tragedies which attracted most attention in the period overwhelmingly featured female protagonists.
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Through poems, prose, and crackerjack translator's notes that tend to merge the two, Carson has long emphasized how Greek tragedies upset norms and feature at their heart a volatile sexuality.
All Greek tragedies were written in trilogies, and "The Oresteia" is the only one whose three parts have survived to today.
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Woodrow Kroll, the founder of the Center for Bible Engagement observed that "While many in the sciences and humanities are dismissive of the biblical narratives, Kalman Kaplan finds in them healing both for the heart and mind, as opposed to the hopelessness of Greek tragedies. This unique approach is refreshing and informing, Kaplan gets you to rethink the validity of the Greek tragedy as the basis for modern psychology and offers a helpful alternative."
Doerries details various aspects of that story as well as the larger narrative of tragic theater's origin in two new books--a memoir, The Theater of War: What Ancient Greek Tragedy Can Teach Us Today, and a collection of translations, All That You've Seen Here is God: New Versions of Four Greek Tragedies. We asked Doerries to take time out from an intense schedule to discuss not only his books, which are getting exceptional reviews in places like the Science Times and The New York Times Book Review, but the reception of his various ground-breaking social impact theater projects, his views on ancient tragedy, and the relevance of this ancient art form for the military community in the wake of our recent wars.
The earliest translation of ancient Greek tragedies can be traced to [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Zuoren Zhou) who translated a part of Euripides's The Trojan Women based on its English version translated by Gilbert Murray.
The mythological construction of Western civilizational origins lying in Classical Greek and Roman heritage has often served to illuminate more about the West's conception of itself (and often its own superiority) at the time of the mythologizing than any true historical connections between Classical Greek and Roman societies and modern Western societies, suggests the author, who analyzes these representations as they emerge in contemporary and modern Western theatrical appropriations of Classical Greek tragedies, particularly focusing on questions of community and identity.