Green Hmong


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Green Hmong

n.
See Mong.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, there are 18 Hmong clans (Cooper, 1998; Lee & Tapp, 2010), with two major classes (Green Hmong and White Hmong), which are distinguishable by dialect, clothing designs, and geographical region (Cooper, 1998; Duffy et al., 2004; Lee, 1990; Lee & Tapp, 2010).
The Hmong sometimes identify with a certain group of Hmong, such as Green Hmong, Blue Hmong, Striped Hmong, and White Hmong.
All of the conversations take place in Hmong language, using a blend of the White Hmong and Green Hmong dialects that are most common in the United States.
For the Green Hmong, we may start with William Geddes's Migrants of the Mountains: The Cultural Ecology of the Blue Miao (Hmong Njua) of Thailand, published in 1976.(51) This book begins with a useful introduction to the Miao-speaking peoples, both outside and within Thailand, and proceeds to aspects of Miao social organization (all in Part One), before narrowing its focus (Part Two) to a particular Green Hmong village in Chiang Mai province.(52) Most specifically, Geddes is concerned with the village's economy, based (when he studied the community in the 1960s) principally on the production of dry rice and opium.
(12) There are, however, also Green Hmong speakers living at Khek Noi.
In other YouTube videos comments are also occasionally in Green Hmong, Laotian or Thai.
There are more than 40 clans of Hmong who are divided into 6 groups including: Hmong Der (white Hmong), Hmong Du (black Hmong), Hmong Si (Red Hmong); Hmong Dua (Green Hmong); Hmong Lenh (flowery Hmong) and Hmong Xua (Crossbred Hmong).
These are also known as Green Hmong and White Hmong dialects, respectively.
The Green Hmong and armband Hmong, who wear bands on their jacket sleeves, live in Thailand and Laos.
2004 "A Note on the Ethno-Semantics of Proverb Usage in Mong Njua (Green Hmong)" in Tapp, Nicholas et al.
The book is written by a Thai anthropologist who lived with the Green Hmong (28) (tribes (29) are primarily distinguished by the color of clothes they choose to wear; there are Green Hmong, Black Hmong, Flower Hmong, etc.) for at least two years in a mountainous village in Thailand.
We conducted the interviews in Hmong or English, as the participant preferred, as we both speak English and White Hmong and one of us understands Green Hmong.