greenfield

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Related to Greenfield land: Brownfield site

green·field

 (grēn′fēld′)
n.
A piece of usually semirural property that is undeveloped except for agricultural use, especially one considered as a site for expanding urban development.

greenfield

(ˈɡriːnˌfiːld)
n
(Environmental Science) (modifier) denoting or located in a rural area which has not previously been built on: new factories were erected on greenfield sites.
Translations

greenfield

[ˈgriːnˌfiːld] N (also greenfield site) → solar m or terreno m sin edificar

greenfield

[ˈgriːnfiːld] modif
greenfield site → zone f d'espace vertgreen fingers npl (British) to have green fingers (= be good with plants) → avoir la main verte
References in periodicals archive ?
9 March 2018 - UK-based property development and investment company Urban and Civic plc (LSE: UANC) has exchanged contracts with Claydon Estate LLP on a conditional agreement in relation to 785 acres of greenfield land on the Claydon Estate near Calvert in Aylesbury Vale, Buckinghamshire, the company said.
It will be a temporary facility, completed in phases, and would lie on 15 hectares of greenfield land east of Wylfa.
In total, the site has around 700 acres of prime development land available to investors, including around 300 acres of Greenfield land much of which is suitable for light industrial operations.
AN opposition councillor in Cardiff says his fears over development on greenfield land have been justified by the city's local development plan being given the go-ahead.
Much greenfield land is within or on the edge of settlements and has limited agricultural value or biodiversity.
RESIDENTS are set to protest against plans for a controversial housing scheme on greenfield land.
There is a crucial difference - greenfield land is where a lot of housing gets built but green belt land is nationally and permanently protected in law.
CAMPAIGNERS fighting to save greenfield land from development have hit out at Liverpool council's "false promises".
Chief secretary to the Treasury, Danny Alexander, revealed that the new homes will be built by the Stewart Milne Group on a new development on greenfield land in Aberdeen, anticipated to be called the Countesswells.
The borough council seems not to have learned any lessons as it continues to dither about the introduction of a Local Plan and needs to begin consulting with the public about a Borough Plan urgently or this type of potential development on greenfield land could continue to happen anywhere in the borough without local people having any say.
Although 16 possible sites were inspected around Malton, the preferred location has always been adjacent to the town's rugby club, but as this is greenfield land the IJF must organise archeological surveys and traffic surveys, among a lengthy checklist of requirements, in order to satisfy the local planning regulations.
While there may be a situation that new industrial sites come on stream, it may be that the council has to make some difficult political decisions including allocating greenfield land for development.