Greenland

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Green·land

 (grēn′lənd, -lănd′)
An island in the northern Atlantic Ocean off northeast Canada. It is the largest island in the world and lies mostly within the Arctic Circle. Settled by the Norse between the 10th and the 15th century and by the Inuit beginning around the 10th century, Greenland became a Danish colony in the 18th century and was granted home rule in 1979. Nuuk (Godthåb) is the capital.

Green·land′ic (-lăn′dĭk) adj.
Word History: How did a glacier-covered island get the name Greenland? In Icelandic sagas written in the 12th century and later, it is told that Eric the Red explored the southeast and southwest coasts of Greenland in ad 983-986. He thought his fellow Icelanders would be more likely to go there if it had an attractive name, and he therefore called it Grænland, Icelandic for "Greenland." This was not exactly a case of false advertising. Greenland was warmer in the 10th century than it is now. There were many islands teeming with birds off its western coast, the sea was excellent for fishing, and the coast of Greenland itself had many fjords where anchorage was good. Moreover, at the head of the fjords there were enormous meadows full of grass, willows, junipers, birch, and wild berries. Icelanders set up colonies in Greenland that thrived for much of the next three hundred years. In the middle of the 14th century, however, the North Atlantic area began to cool significantly. The colonies began to die out, and they finally disappeared at the very beginning of the 15th century. Only the Inuit continued to live on the island as the climate grew progressively colder and the formerly green valleys of Greenland were covered by ice.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Greenland

(ˈɡriːnlənd)
n
(Placename) a large island, lying mostly within the Arctic Circle off the NE coast of North America: first settled by Icelanders in 986; resettled by Danes from 1721 onwards; integral part of Denmark (1953–79); granted internal autonomy 1979; mostly covered by an icecap up to 3300 m (11 000 ft) thick, with ice-free coastal strips and coastal mountains; the population is largely Inuit, with a European minority; fishing, hunting, and mining. Capital: Nuuk (Godthåb). Pop: 57 714 (2013 est). Area: 175 600 sq km (840 000 sq miles). Danish name: Grønland Greenlandic name: Kalaallit Nunaat
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Green•land

(ˈgrin lənd, -ˌlænd)

n.
a self-governing island belonging to Denmark located NE of North America: the largest island in the world. 58,203; ab. 840,000 sq. mi. (2,175,600 sq. km); over 700,000 sq. mi. (1,800,000 sq. km) icecapped. Cap.: Godthåb.
Green′land•er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Greenland - the largest island in the worldGreenland - the largest island in the world; lies between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean; a self-governing province of Denmark
Thule - a town in northwestern Greenland; during World War II a United States naval base was built there
Arctic Ocean - ice covered waters surrounding the North Pole; mostly covered with solid ice or with ice floes and icebergs
Atlantic, Atlantic Ocean - the 2nd largest ocean; separates North and South America on the west from Europe and Africa on the east
subcontinent - a large and distinctive landmass (as India or Greenland) that is a distinct part of some continent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Grónsko
Grønland
Grönlanti
Grenland
グリーンランド
그린란드
Grönland
ประเทศกรีนแลนด์
đảo Greenland

Greenland

[ˈgriːnlənd] NGroenlandia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Greenland

[ˈgriːnlənd] nGroenland m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Greenland

nGrönland nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Greenland

[ˈgriːnlənd] nGroenlandia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Greenland

جرينلاند Grónsko Grønland Grönland Γροιλανδία Groenlandia Grönlanti Groenland Grenland Groenlandia グリーンランド 그린란드 Groenland Grønland Grenlandia Groelândia, Gronelândia Гренландия Grönland ประเทศกรีนแลนด์ Grönland đảo Greenland 格陵兰
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
"She's a public lunger or she wouldn't have been singing the Benedicite; and she's a Greenlander or she wouldn't have snow-blinds over her colloids," said George at last.
Only three years ago, when climate-Armageddon was not as fashionable as it is now, the Guardian ran an upbeat feature headlined: "Greenland: the country set to cash in on climate change." In 2009 the BBC reported: "For Greenlanders ...
For the 56,000 Greenlanders, 90% of whom are Inuit (Eskimo), the geostrategic implications of Chinese investment are irrelevant -- and they are probably right about that.
Greenlanders and Danish politicians reacted with disbelief.
Aasiaat manages to do both and is a wonderful way to experience what life is really like for Greenlanders.
This episode shows how, for a few weeks a year, China's Yunnan province is carpeted in yellow as millions of rapeseed flowers bloom, while Greenlanders play football underneath the dazzling Northern Lights.
Among the topics are women's human rights in the governance of the Arctic: gender equality and violence against Indigenous women, the right of Indigenous people to education in their own language: Greenlanders in Denmark and in Greenland, uranium in Greenland: questions of resources and security in a self-government setting, and problems in the Law of the Sea relating to insular formations of ice-bound seas and polar regions of the Arctic: judicial dicta in US v.
She met Danes and Greenlanders of all ages, hearing their legends and learning about the challenges of adapting to modern life.
Similar scenarios to the events in Taan Fjord have been reported in glacial regions such as Norway and Patagonia, and even cost the lives of four Greenlanders when they were killed by a tsunami with waves up to 90 metres high that hit Nuugaatsiaq in June 2017.
This enraged Greenlanders and eventually Denmark was forced to come up with the lion's share of the investment cash itself.
It will be recalled that Odi community over the weekend lost three youths and several other persons were injured as a result of the cult clash between the Greenlanders and Icelanders confraternities.
Unlike the 13th century Greenlanders who just picked up their valuables and moved, we don't all need to become migrants.