greenth

greenth

(ɡriːnθ)
n
greenness or verdure
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the suffix -th ceased to be productive after the Middle English period, Walpole's coinages greenth, blueth and gloomth clearly display "non-productive creativity" in the sense of Bauer (2001: 64).
Visitors would have then participated in a guided tour by the housekeeper (or Walpole himself if they were important enough) of the antiquarian contents of the interior, eventually emerging, after experiencing a series of Gothic spaces, from the 'gloomth' of the monastic interior with an increasing sense of history, into the 'greenth' of the garden.
His Adams praises Nikko's great shogun temples: "a mountain flank with its evergreens a hundred feet high modelled into a royal posthumous residence and deified abode." Chalfant does not comment on Adams' grudging admiration of accomplishment beyond "what I should have thought possible for Japs," or his neat summary ending: "It is a sort of Egypt in lacquer and greenth." As with the pottery-owner's wife, the comparison simultaneously flatters and belittles, but--possibly taking Adams' own advice to cut "whatever seems to delay the story, for a biography ought to be a story"--Chalfant doesn't pause to comment on the language.
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